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The folklore of the Scottish Highlands (1976)

by Anne Ross

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1551145,814 (3.71)2
The folklore of the Scottish Highlands is unique and very much alive. Dr Anne Ross is a Gaelic-speaking scholar and archaeologist who has lived and worked in crofting communities. This has enabled her to collect information at first hand and to assess the veracity of material already published. In this substantially revised edition of a classic work first published 30 years ago, she portrays the beliefs and customs of Scottish Gaelic society, including: seasonal customs deriving from Celtic festivals; the famous waulking songs; the Highland tradition of seers and second sight; omens and taboos, both good and bad; and, chilling experiences of witchcraft and the Evil Eye Rituals associated with birth and death. Having taken her MA, MA Hons and PhD at the University of Edinburgh, Anne Ross became Research Fellow in the School of Scottish Studies, Edinburgh. She then rapidly established herself as one of Britain's leading Celtic scholars. Her seminal work is "Pagan Celtic Britain" and she has also published "Druids - Preachers of Immortality" with Tempus Publishing.… (more)
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Dr. Ross has a handle on all things Celtic..This volume is no exception..Her sources may be from "the whence and the hither" and she is well known in those regions. It makes me proud to know that she is "out and about" ( )
  zymmer4 | Jan 19, 2009 |
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'For Berenice'
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In 1871 Queen Victoria's daughter, Princess Louise, married John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, heir to the 8th Duke of Argyll, and 'Wasna' the Queen a proud woman!', commented Punch.  (Foreword)
Two boys, whose birth beyond all question springs

From great and glorious, tho' forgotten kings,

Shepherds of Scottish lineage, born and bred

On the same bleak and barren mountain's head,

Jockey with mickle art, could on the bagpipes play,

E'en from the rising to the setting day;

Sawney as long without remorse could bawl

HOME's madrigals and ditties from FINGAL.

In these lines from his Prophecy of Famine, the strongly anti-Scottish priest-poet, Charles Churchill, writing from his living under the shadow of another Celtic stronghold, South Cadbury in Somerset, showed a subtle knowledge and appreciation of an ancient tradition, the rich heritage of Gaelic Scotland.  (Introduction)
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The folklore of the Scottish Highlands is unique and very much alive. Dr Anne Ross is a Gaelic-speaking scholar and archaeologist who has lived and worked in crofting communities. This has enabled her to collect information at first hand and to assess the veracity of material already published. In this substantially revised edition of a classic work first published 30 years ago, she portrays the beliefs and customs of Scottish Gaelic society, including: seasonal customs deriving from Celtic festivals; the famous waulking songs; the Highland tradition of seers and second sight; omens and taboos, both good and bad; and, chilling experiences of witchcraft and the Evil Eye Rituals associated with birth and death. Having taken her MA, MA Hons and PhD at the University of Edinburgh, Anne Ross became Research Fellow in the School of Scottish Studies, Edinburgh. She then rapidly established herself as one of Britain's leading Celtic scholars. Her seminal work is "Pagan Celtic Britain" and she has also published "Druids - Preachers of Immortality" with Tempus Publishing.

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CONTENTS:

Acknowledgments 

Foreward 

1. Introduction 

2. Clan Lore 

3. Seers and Second Sight 

4. Witchcraft, Black and White 

5. Cures, Omens, Tabus, and Social Customs 

6. Life and Death 

7. The Seasons: Calendar Festivals and the Daily Round 

8. Epilogue 

Notes 

Folk Museums 

Bibliography 

Glossary 

Index of Motifs 

General Index 
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