HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Hammer of God by Arthur C. Clarke
Loading...

The Hammer of God (original 1993; edition 1994)

by Arthur C. Clarke (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2563110,947 (3.34)28
A century into the future, technology has solved most of the problems that have plagued our time. However, a new problem is on the horizon-one greater than humanity has ever faced. A massive asteroid is racing toward the earth, and its impact could destroy all life on the planet. Immediately after the asteroid-named "Kali" after the Hindu goddess of chaos and destruction-is discovered, the world's greatest scientists begin their search for a way to prevent disaster. In the meantime, Captain Robert Singh, aboard the starship Goliath, may be the only person who can stop the asteroid. But this heroic role may demand the ultimate sacrifice.… (more)
Member:Gopal_Kamath
Title:The Hammer of God
Authors:Arthur C. Clarke (Author)
Info:Bantam Books (1994), Edition: Reissue, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Hammer of God by Arthur C. Clarke (1993)

  1. 00
    Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven (sturlington)
    sturlington: Also about a meteor impact.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 28 mentions

English (28)  Finnish (2)  Spanish (1)  All languages (31)
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
I love Arthur C Clarke for his superb world-building and philosophical narrative style, but the man cannot write a suspenseful plot to save his life. Ugh. ( )
  lightkensei | May 17, 2020 |
Once again the earth is menaced by an asteroid. Unfortunately, this is no longer fiction. ( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
This late work by the author deals with an SF cliche, an asteroid on track to crash into Earth and wipe out most life. I have to say that this was not my favourite example of that sub-genre. While Clarke writes with his usual fluency and hard science background, I felt that the whole was less than the sum of its (often very good) parts. The main character Robert Singh had a significant backstory, though I found the to-ing and fro-ing within his timeline a little confusing. There was just not enough plot, and not until the last quarter or so did the threat of worldwide destruction really come through. So, all in all, a little disappointing, though a quick read at under 200 pages. ( )
  john257hopper | Aug 27, 2019 |
This is one of Clarke's later novels, and less well known than some of his classic stories from his vintage period during the late 1970s and through the 1980s. It does, however, rank with the best of his books. All his customary traits are on display: plausible and empathetic characters, a well-constructed plot and a scientific context that is technically viable yet also readily accessible to even the most scientifically ignorant (among whose ranks I immediately declare myself).

The novel is set in the late twenty-second century at a time when Earth has established colonies on Mars and beyond. Quite by chance, amateur astronomer Dr Angus Miller discovers a new asteroid moving through the far reaches of the solar system. Closer inspection shows that its trajectory will put it on a collision course with Earth. Given its immense size it soon becomes evident that the impact will be as catastrophic as that which caused the demise of the dinosaurs some 65 million years ago.

In recognition of its lethal potential the asteroid is name Kali, after the fierce, retributive Hindu goddess. Earth is not defenceless, though, and plans are brought into play to try to deflect Kali from its current course. Robert Singh, captain of the spaceship Goliath stationed at the Lagrange Point ahead of Jupiter's orbit, is ordered to go to Kali, and attach a fission motor and huge supplies of fuel, with a view to nudging Kali off its current course. A deviation of even a few centimetres that far out should be sufficient at that distance to deflect Kali sufficiently away from its lethal course and save the home planet.

This all sounds far too simple and straightforward, and there has to be a catch. Back on Earth religious fundamentalism rears its head, in the guise of Chrislam, a hybrid faith that had established a strong hold over millions of followers during the twenty-first century. Chrislamists see the threat posed by Kali as a divine sign - if it impacts with Earth and wreaks havoc, killing billions of people, then that will be the will of God, and his followers will join him in Heaven and enjoy his everlasting redemption. If, on the other hand, it passes safely by, then God will have intervened and shown his divine mercy.

Clarke gives us an engaging story embellished with touches of satire, comedy and emotion. All in all, a heady mix, and Clarke shows how powerful and worthy science fiction can be, when crafted by a master. ( )
  Eyejaybee | Aug 18, 2019 |
In The Hammer of God, a comet threatens to destroy human life on the planet Earth. This doesn’t represent all of humanity, since humans have colonized the moon and the planet Mars, so in a worst case scenario, the human race lives on. Tasked with the monumental challenge of redirecting the comet is Captain Singh and his crew of scientists on the Goliath with a laser weapon that is designed to slightly redirect the course of the comet so that it doesn’t splatter Earth. Plan B is to use a massive warhead attached to a missile, which still may not solve the problem, only splinter the comet into many smaller pieces, which still may do serious damage.

If you strip down the book to its basic plot, it’s about the size of a long short story or a short novella. There isn’t really a whole lot to it. Mostly the novel is a series of flashbacks and backstory, but there wasn’t a whole lot of meat on the bones so to speak. As a result, there wasn’t a whole lot of continuity in the novel and it felt very scattered. It was a quick read, but at the same time it seemed there was a significant amount of fluff. Ultimately, I thought it was a solid read but it didn’t wow me.

Carl Alves – author of Reconquest: Mother Earth ( )
  Carl_Alves | May 25, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Clarke, Arthur C.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Avon, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Edelstein, Glen M.Designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rosvall, MattiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, Jamie S. WarrenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
All the events in the past happened at the times and places stated; all those set in the future are possible.
And one is certain.
Sooner or later, we will meet Kali.
Dedication
First words
It was the size of a small house, weighed nine thousand tons, and was moving at fifty thousand kilometres an hour.
Quotations
The cosmic iceberg came in from the direction of the Sun, so no one saw its approach until the sky exploded. Seconds later, the shock wave flattened two thousand square kilometres of pine forest, and the loudest sound since the eruption of Krakatoa began to circle the world.

Had the cometary fragment been delayed a mere two hours on its age-long journey, the ten-megaton blast would have obliterated Moscow and changed the course of history.

The date was 30 June 1908.
It came in vertically, punching a hole ten kilometres wide through the atmosphere, generating temperatures so high that the air itself started to burn. When it hit the ground, rock turned to liquid and spread outwards in mountainous waves, not freezing until it had formed a crater two hundred kilometres across.

That was only the beginning of disaster; now the real tragedy began.

Nitric oxides rained from the air, turning the sea to acid. Clouds of soot from incinerated forests darkened the sky, hiding the sun for months. Worldwide, the temperature dropped precipitously, killing off most of the plants and animals that had survived the initial cataclysm. Though some species would linger on for millenia, the reign of the great reptiles was finally over.

The clock of evolution had been reset; the countdown to man had begun.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

A century into the future, technology has solved most of the problems that have plagued our time. However, a new problem is on the horizon-one greater than humanity has ever faced. A massive asteroid is racing toward the earth, and its impact could destroy all life on the planet. Immediately after the asteroid-named "Kali" after the Hindu goddess of chaos and destruction-is discovered, the world's greatest scientists begin their search for a way to prevent disaster. In the meantime, Captain Robert Singh, aboard the starship Goliath, may be the only person who can stop the asteroid. But this heroic role may demand the ultimate sacrifice.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.34)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 32
2.5 8
3 98
3.5 23
4 89
4.5 4
5 15

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,566,227 books! | Top bar: Always visible