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Growing Up in England: The Experience of Childhood 1600-1914

by Anthony Fletcher

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17None978,492 (4)None
This book presents an entirely fresh view of the upbringing of English children in upper and professional class families over three centuries. Drawing on direct testimony from contemporary diaries and letters, the book revises previous understandings of parenting and what it was like to grow up in the period between 1600 and 1914. Using advice literature which set out developing ideologies of childhood, gender and parenting, the book explores the separate but complementary roles of mothers and fathers in raising their children. Male upbringing is discussed in terms of schooling, female through the moral and social context of a domestic schoolroom dominated by a governess. Boys were trained for the world, girls for society and marriage. Rare teenage diaries surviving from the Georgian and Victorian periods show teenagers speaking for themselves about education; relationships with parents, siblings and friends;  and their social, class and gender identity.… (more)
  1. 00
    A Lasting Relationship: Parents and Children Over Three Centuries by Linda Pollock (nessreader)
    nessreader: Lasting Relationship is an anthology of contemporary letter, biography and diary extracts about the history of childhood in the UK and US, while Growing Up In England is a narrative history by a modern historian, providing more context on one hand. On the other hand, G Up in E has a narrower selection of subjects - fewer children represented, and posher ones. Both highly recommended. G Up in E is a smoother read.… (more)
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This book presents an entirely fresh view of the upbringing of English children in upper and professional class families over three centuries. Drawing on direct testimony from contemporary diaries and letters, the book revises previous understandings of parenting and what it was like to grow up in the period between 1600 and 1914. Using advice literature which set out developing ideologies of childhood, gender and parenting, the book explores the separate but complementary roles of mothers and fathers in raising their children. Male upbringing is discussed in terms of schooling, female through the moral and social context of a domestic schoolroom dominated by a governess. Boys were trained for the world, girls for society and marriage. Rare teenage diaries surviving from the Georgian and Victorian periods show teenagers speaking for themselves about education; relationships with parents, siblings and friends;  and their social, class and gender identity.

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Yale University Press

2 editions of this book were published by Yale University Press.

Editions: 0300118503, 0300163967

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