HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Uno sguardo indietro by Edith Wharton
Loading...

Uno sguardo indietro (original 1934; edition 2016)

by Edith Wharton (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
367655,055 (3.88)21
In his Introduction, Louis Auchincloss calls the writing in A Backward Glance "as firm and crisp and lucid as in the best of her novels".Written in 1934, three years before her death, A Backward Glance is a vivid account of Wharton's public and private life. With richness and delicacy, Wharton describes the sophisticated New York society she grew up in, chronicles her travels in France, Italy, and North Africa, and re-creates the expatriate community she helped establish in Paris during the 1920s and '30s. In delightful portraits of her circle of friends, she offers candid and memorable profiles of Henry James, Bernard Berenson, Logan Pearsall Smith, Isadora Duncan, and many other leading cultural figures of her time.… (more)
Member:Mati97
Title:Uno sguardo indietro
Authors:Edith Wharton (Author)
Info:Elliot (2016), 301 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

A Backward Glance: An Autobiography by Edith Wharton (1934)

Recently added byprivate library, bookishbill, marita_p, BooksCatsEtc, books-n-pickles, MMBlibrarian, wayman, Mati97, Dannokbk
Legacy LibrariesH.D., Ernest Hemingway
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 21 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
don't quite know what to say about this. almost nothing about her personal life which one usually expects a memoir to be about. lots of travelling, friends--mostly men. i don't really enjoy wharton's fiction so why would i enjoy this? this book is not in any of the memoir books i have??? ( )
  mahallett | Apr 2, 2013 |
Edith Wharton writes with humility, despite being born into a wealthy family and achieving literary success during her lifetime. She writes with grace, choosing not to divulge details of an unhappy marriage and divorce. She writes with wit and candor of her travels and many friendships that enriched her life.

It is fitting that Edith Wharton chose the title for her autobiography from the words of Walt Whitman, a man she much admired: “So here I sit gossiping in the early candle-light of old age--I and my book--casting backward glances over our travel’d road.” I’m so glad Mrs. Wharton was able to look backward from the vantage point of her 70-plus years when she wrote this autobiography to share the many experiences that influenced her writing over the course of her journey through life. ( )
2 vote Donna828 | Aug 30, 2011 |
This is more of a literary memoir than an autobiography, although definitely worthy of a read by anyone who enjoys Wharton's fiction. The book traces the earliest beginnings of young Edith's desire to create stories and goes on to describe her growing friendships with other authors, extensive travels, active social life, and publication successes.

Wharton has a wealth of anecdotes about her friends and acquaintances, but little to say about herself or her personal life. Her husband is mentioned in no more than five sentences in the entire book. Not to be missed, however, is a fat section on Henry James in both his middle and older years.

The book really ends at World War I. There is some general commentary on the hardships of the war and some complaints about the coarseness of "the modern world," but nothing of any substance. ( )
  woolenough | Dec 3, 2009 |
I was tickled that the divorce was somehow dropped from Wharton's memoir. Edith Wharton had such a mess of a marriage I was greedy to read about it, but she didn't budge in the telling. Still, a book you shouldn't miss if literary memoir is your bailiwick. ( )
  AnitaDTaylor | Oct 27, 2007 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"A backward glance o'er travell'd roads." Walt Whitman;

"Je veux remonter le penchant de mes belles années...", Chateubriand: Mémoires d'Outre Tombe;

"Kein Genuss ist vorübergehend", Goethe: Wilhelm Meister.
Dedication
To the friends who every year on All Souls' Night come and sit with me by the fire.
First words
Years ago I said to myself: "There's no such thing as old age; there is only sorrow".
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

In his Introduction, Louis Auchincloss calls the writing in A Backward Glance "as firm and crisp and lucid as in the best of her novels".Written in 1934, three years before her death, A Backward Glance is a vivid account of Wharton's public and private life. With richness and delicacy, Wharton describes the sophisticated New York society she grew up in, chronicles her travels in France, Italy, and North Africa, and re-creates the expatriate community she helped establish in Paris during the 1920s and '30s. In delightful portraits of her circle of friends, she offers candid and memorable profiles of Henry James, Bernard Berenson, Logan Pearsall Smith, Isadora Duncan, and many other leading cultural figures of her time.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.88)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 6
3.5 1
4 12
4.5 4
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,534,941 books! | Top bar: Always visible