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Relic (Pendergast Series Book 1) by Douglas…
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Relic (Pendergast Series Book 1) (original 1995; edition 2007)

by Douglas Preston (Author)

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4,4471191,809 (3.87)163
The book that started the New York Times bestselling collaboration of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Just days before a massive exhibition opens at the popular New York Museum of Natural History, visitors are being savagely murdered in the museum's dark hallways and secret rooms. Autopsies indicate that the killer cannot be human... But the museum's directors plan to go ahead with a big bash to celebrate the new exhibition, in spite of the murders. Museum researcher Margo Green must find out who-or what-is doing the killing. But can she do it in time to stop the massacre? Special lower priced edition available for a limited time.… (more)
Member:DavideValecchi
Title:Relic (Pendergast Series Book 1)
Authors:Douglas Preston (Author)
Info:Forge Books (2007), 484 pages
Collections:Your library
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Relic by Douglas Preston (1995)

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» See also 163 mentions

English (108)  Spanish (4)  Dutch (3)  German (2)  French (1)  All languages (118)
Showing 1-5 of 108 (next | show all)
“Relic” was published only twenty years ago but it reads like it’s from at least a decade earlier – less “Jurrasic Park”, more “Poseidon Adventure”.

“Relic” is based on a complex idea on how a monstrous creature might evolve but the exposition of the idea is clumsily done. Most of the book reads like a “Monster In The Basement” slash/horror piece except without the exploitative gore.

It was a fun as a leisurely “remember when they wrote books like this?” read, but wouldn’t really count as a thriller today: the pace is too slow, the build up goes on for too long, one of the main action sequences happens off-stage, and there are too many characters.

It does have some good “Saturday Matinee” moments: there is a rude, cowardly, stupid FBI Special Agent to hiss and boo at; an urbane Southern Gentleman, FBI Special Agent to cheer for (although, if you do, he’ll look modestly away and say “I did nothing particularly praiseworthy), a rough but brave NYPD Lieutenant to save the day; venal academics who suppress the truth and pay the price for it and brave, politically correct academics (an older prof in a wheel chair and his young, female grad student) who pursue the truth and save the day. Finally, there is The Creature. It’s a well thought through Creature, probably the best thing in the book, but it still screams werewolf meets lizard man.

The structure of the book creaks: there’s a slow opening in Africa, then another opening in New York, that explains everything that happened in Africa, then the main action when The Creature attacks, then a “Six Weeks Later…” section to wrap up the odds and ends, then an Epilogue that finally (but still slowly) explains the plot and set up a the sequel.

Oddly, one of the things that sticks with me about the book was how annoyed I was at the fictional New York Natural History Museum’s lack of care of the items its patrons had pillaged throughout the world. It seems absurd to me that artifacts stolen from the Sioux, the Inuit and the Navajo would be labelled “Anthropology”, but that’s the kind of dissonance that makes reading period books interesting.

Another minor irritation was the authors’ use of “shined” instead of “shone” and “knealed” instead of “knelt”. Why would an editor let that usage pass, except in direct speech?

“Relic” was made into a not-bad creature feature called ” The Relic”. The plot remained much the same, the number of characters was reduced and, for reasons I don’t understand, the action moved from New York to Chicago. ( )
  MikeFinnFiction | Sep 12, 2020 |
I was quite excited to read this book, but it was a big pile of "meh". Perhaps it was the topic or the characters, but it just didn't live up to the hype. There is a pretty big series built on this initial book, but I won't be reading book 2 for a long time. I'm giving Preston & Child one more book (The Ice Limit) and if that turns out to be a dud, they might officially be on my blacklist. ( )
  cgfaulknerog | May 28, 2020 |
“Relic” was published only twenty years ago but it reads like it’s from at least a decade earlier – less “Jurrasic Park”, more “Poseidon Adventure”.

“Relic” is based on a complex idea on how a monstrous creature might evolve but the exposition of the idea is clumsily done. Most of the book reads like a “Monster In The Basement” slash/horror piece except without the exploitative gore.

It was a fun as a leisurely “remember when they wrote books like this?” read, but wouldn’t really count as a thriller today: the pace is too slow, the build up goes on for too long, one of the main action sequences happens off-stage, and there are too many characters.

It does have some good “Saturday Matinee” moments: there is a rude, cowardly, stupid FBI Special Agent to hiss and boo at; an urbane Southern Gentleman, FBI Special Agent to cheer for (although, if you do, he’ll look modestly away and say “I did nothing particularly praiseworthy), a rough but brave NYPD Lieutenant to save the day; venal academics who suppress the truth and pay the price for it and brave, politically correct academics (an older prof in a wheel chair and his young, female grad student) who pursue the truth and save the day. Finally, there is The Creature. It’s a well thought through Creature, probably the best thing in the book, but it still screams werewolf meets lizard man.

The structure of the book creaks: there’s a slow opening in Africa, then another opening in New York, that explains everything that happened in Africa, then the main action when The Creature attacks, then a “Six Weeks Later…” section to wrap up the odds and ends, then an Epilogue that finally (but still slowly) explains the plot and set up a the sequel.

Oddly, one of the things that sticks with me about the book was how annoyed I was at the fictional New York Natural History Museum’s lack of care of the items its patrons had pillaged throughout the world. It seems absurd to me that artifacts stolen from the Sioux, the Inuit and the Navajo would be labelled “Anthropology”, but that’s the kind of dissonance that makes reading period books interesting.

Another minor irritation was the authors’ use of “shined” instead of “shone” and “knealed” instead of “knelt”. Why would an editor let that usage pass, except in direct speech?

“Relic” was made into a not-bad creature feature called ” The Relic”. The plot remained much the same, the number of characters was reduced and, for reasons I don’t understand, the action moved from New York to Chicago. ( )
  MikeFinnFiction | May 16, 2020 |
This is only the second full novel I've read of Preston and Childs, and I think they are my new favorite collaborators. The story is sharp and seamless, and it flows from the very beginning. I had an idea where the story was going, and I couldn't care less, for once. I even knew the secret of the whole story line and was perfectly fine with it. I was hoping the authors collaboration were just as good in the beginning as they were in Cemetery Dance, and it is.
All the technical, scientific jargon was difficult at times, but that's what Google search is for. Hearing about a museum that large just made me want to visit, soon.
I can't wait to read the next book in the series, and find out more about the characters and their differences. I find myself so very involved, totally sucked into the story from the first chapter, I don't spend a single minute of trying to figure out which author is writing which part. And that's an added bonus, I think.
Do yourself a favor, and read one of their novels, today. ( )
  stephanie_M | Apr 30, 2020 |
3.5/5 or 7/10 ( )
  Apoorv_Jha | Mar 23, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 108 (next | show all)
En 1986, en plena selva amazónica, un grupo de científicos encuentra la talla de un enigmático dios adorado por una tribu de salvajes. El extraño ídolo es enviado a Nueva York, donde queda arrumbado en los sótanos de un enorme y antiguo museo. Poco después, los científicos son masacrados por los indígenas y todo el proyecto cae en el olvido. Sin embargo, con ocasión de una importante exposición, las sinuosas galerías y los vetustos subsuelos del museo se convierten en escenario de varios asesinatos horrendos e inexplicables... Un mundo de maldiciones y pesadillas ancestrales instalado en el corazón del Nueva York actual. The Relic ha sido adaptado al cine en una película del productor de Alien y del creador de los efectos especiales de Parque Jurásico.
added by Pakoniet | editLecturalia
 

» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Douglas Prestonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Child, Lincolnmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Colacci, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Knaur (60358)

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To Charles Crumby - D.P.

To Luchie, who came along for the ride. And in memory of Nora and Gaga - L.C.
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At noon, the clouds clinging to the top of Cerro Gordo broke free and scattered.
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The book that started the New York Times bestselling collaboration of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Just days before a massive exhibition opens at the popular New York Museum of Natural History, visitors are being savagely murdered in the museum's dark hallways and secret rooms. Autopsies indicate that the killer cannot be human... But the museum's directors plan to go ahead with a big bash to celebrate the new exhibition, in spite of the murders. Museum researcher Margo Green must find out who-or what-is doing the killing. But can she do it in time to stop the massacre? Special lower priced edition available for a limited time.

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Just days before a massive exhibition opens at the popular New York Museum of Natural History, visitors are being savagely murdered in the museum's dark hallways and secret rooms. Autopsies indicate that the killer cannot be human....

But the museum's directors plan to go ahead with a big bash to celebrate the new exhibition, in spite of the murders.

Museum researcher Margo Green must find out who--or what--is doing the killing But can she do it in time to stop the massacre?
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