HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

A People's History of American Empire: A Graphic Adaptation

by Paul Buhle, Mike Konopacki (Illustrator)

Other authors: Howard Zinn (Contributor)

Series: A People's History, The American Empire Project

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7212331,921 (4.05)8
Adapted from the critically acclaimed chronicle of U.S. history, a study of American expansionism around the world is told from a grassroots perspective and provides an analysis of important events from Wounded Knee to Iraq.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
La antesala perfecta para lanzarse al libro ( )
  Orellana_Souto | Jul 27, 2021 |
Patchy quick breeze through American history, feel like Zinn's book doesn't really work as a graphic novel. Picked up considerably in the sections where it drew upon his own experiences (e.g. his time serving in WW2). Would have probably loved this at around 16-17 which I guess is the target market. ( )
  arewenotben | Jul 31, 2020 |
A graphic history of the more than two centuries of atrocities committed by the US empire! ( )
  aborham | Nov 26, 2017 |
Obviously, considering my own biases, I loved this book. It makes me really sad about our imperialist history and even though it ended on a note of hope I don't feel. However, I also know that it's not just the U.S. at fault. It's human greed and capitalism in general. So yeah ... I guess read this if you're anti-war. ( )
  Sareene | Oct 22, 2016 |
The graphic format ultimately seems to be little more than a "Let's Make This Appealing to People Who Don't Like to Read" trope. ( )
  R3dH00d | Jun 30, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
The comic book form is a great way of delivering this message, the spreads mix text, cartoons, reproductions of historical documents and photos, making the whole thing visual, dynamic, and absolutely captivating.
added by lampbane | editBoing Boing, Cory Doctorow (Aug 18, 2008)
 
I was stunned to discover that I couldn’t force myself past the second chapter. It’s much too hectoring and didactic, even to those already inclined to be interested in reading a “greatest hits of America’s sins”.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Buhle, PaulAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Konopacki, MikeIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Zinn, HowardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Adapted from the critically acclaimed chronicle of U.S. history, a study of American expansionism around the world is told from a grassroots perspective and provides an analysis of important events from Wounded Knee to Iraq.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.05)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 6
2.5 1
3 14
3.5 8
4 45
4.5 3
5 42

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 207,082,519 books! | Top bar: Always visible