HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Classical Mythology The Romans by Peter…
Loading...

Classical Mythology The Romans (2009)

by Peter Meineck

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
225715,957 (3.42)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 5 of 5
This is a series of fourteen lectures by Professor Meineck. The narrator sounds like the Geico gecko. Emphasis is placed on history and examine texts from the era, which include mythology. It was educational but not highly interesting. ( )
  GlennBell | Dec 16, 2017 |
I liked that this course wasn't the typical focus on the mythic gods of the Romans but more about the origins of their adoption of their gods as well as the mythologies of the seven kings like Coriolanus and the story of Romulus and Remus. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
I liked that this course wasn't the typical focus on the mythic gods of the Romans but more about the origins of their adoption of their gods as well as the mythologies of the seven kings like Coriolanus and the story of Romulus and Remus. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
I admit that my low rating is mostly on my irritation with what I had hoped it contained and by the time I relaxed and went with the material it did contain it was too late; I was terminally bored. It contains a look at how the Roman culture integrated myths and/or adjusted their cultural mythos with lies and manipulation, which reminded me too much of f*x. The saving grace was the last chapter which shows how the Roman myths have carried over into our own culture and history. ( )
  revslick | Apr 10, 2013 |
One of my favorite things about the Modern Scholar series is that the professors who give the lectures are free to enjoy their subject matter. There are no bewildered and deliberately apathetic college students to compete for the space in which I wish to bask in the joy that is learning and the endless satisfaction that comes with the greater understanding of context and willingness to define perspective as a individual thing, no matter how connected to another community that thing is.

The Romans are much maligned, and in some ways deservedly, but the thing that I've never really understood is the relationship between Romans and their mythology. They were innovators in so much, why did they have to 'steal' the Greek gods and rename them and tell different stories about them? Why didn't they have their own gods?

While Peter Meineck does not really answer that last question (mostly, I suspect, because no one asked him. ahem.) he does give air to the individual nature of Roman myths, the gods and the relationship of the people to those gods and to those myths. These are not straightforward, but they are very very familiar, especially when put next to the creation myths of any government or cultural movement. We deify celebrities and tell stories about them that exemplify what we think are the most admirable of our own qualities whether the event ever occurred or was a creation of the media or accident.

I mention joy, because it is obvious that Dr. Meineck cares, in an responsible and intellectual and human way about these stories and the roles that they have played in history and in our own lives today. He is an enjoyable lecturer and he is well organized and delightful to listen to. I heard the whole series twice in one week, I enjoyed it so much.

A thing which it was very easy to do - because I had the space and time in which to do it. ( )
  WaxPoetic | Apr 6, 2010 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Saint Louis University professor Thomas F. Madden delivers lectures on the history of the early Church and the spread of Christianity through the Roman Empire.

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.42)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 1
3.5
4 2
4.5
5 1

Recorded Books

2 editions of this book were published by Recorded Books.

Editions: 1449894127, 1449893201

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,090,409 books! | Top bar: Always visible