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The Russia House by John Le Carré
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The Russia House (original 1989; edition 1989)

by John Le Carré (Author)

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3,238353,063 (3.61)75
It is the third summer of perestroika. Barley Blair, London publisher, receives a smuggled document from Moscow. It contains technical information of overwhelming importance. But is it genuine? Is the author genuine? A plant? A madman? Blair, jazz-loving, drink-marinated, dishevelled, is hardly to the taste of the spymasters, yet he has to be used - sent to the Soviet Union to make contact. Katya, the Moscow intermediary, is beautiful, thoughtful, equally sceptical of all state ideology. Together, as the safe clichés of hostility disintegrate, they may represent the future - an idea that is anathema to the entrenched espionage professionals on both sides. THE RUSSIA HOUSE: a spy story, a love story, and a fable for our time.… (more)
Member:C_Rayburn
Title:The Russia House
Authors:John Le Carré (Author)
Info:Alfred A. Knopf (1989), Edition: 1st, 353 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Russia House by John le Carré (1989)

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» See also 75 mentions

English (26)  Spanish (2)  German (1)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (34)
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
Síðustu ca 20% bókarinnar voru áhugaverð. Mér fannst bókin langdregin og að mestu óáhugaverð og hún fellur fljótt í gleymsku. ( )
  Glumsson | Jun 23, 2021 |
country or love, Barley chooses love
  ritaer | Mar 26, 2021 |
It was put to me recently, although there are tons of famous Australian actors, that isn't so of directors. Really all that got mentioned were Peter Weir and Baz Luhrmann.

Hands up who knows the director of the movie of this book. Looks around, only mine? Okay, Fred Schepisi. You might have seen Six Degrees of Separation or a bunch of other movies he's done.

I'm on a roll, so I'm not stopping there. Robert Scott Hicks? He did most recently The Boys are Back (starring the dreamy Clive Owen), Snow Falling on Cedars, Shine, Hearts in Atlantis. Etc.

So, who directed Driving Miss Daisy, Mao's Last Dancer, Crimes of the Heart, A Good Man in Africa, Tender Mercies....etc etc etc. ETC!!!!! Give in? Bruce Beresford.

Next. Little Women, Oscar and Lucinda, Mrs Soffel...anybody? Gillian Armstrong.

I have no idea what famous Australian directors I might have missed here, I was just scanning a list. Maybe because directors are faceless we are less aware of them. Now, I'm not quite suggesting that Australian directors are AS famous as our actors, I don't think they are. But still....



( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
It was put to me recently, although there are tons of famous Australian actors, that isn't so of directors. Really all that got mentioned were Peter Weir and Baz Luhrmann.

Hands up who knows the director of the movie of this book. Looks around, only mine? Okay, Fred Schepisi. You might have seen Six Degrees of Separation or a bunch of other movies he's done.

I'm on a roll, so I'm not stopping there. Robert Scott Hicks? He did most recently The Boys are Back (starring the dreamy Clive Owen), Snow Falling on Cedars, Shine, Hearts in Atlantis. Etc.

So, who directed Driving Miss Daisy, Mao's Last Dancer, Crimes of the Heart, A Good Man in Africa, Tender Mercies....etc etc etc. ETC!!!!! Give in? Bruce Beresford.

Next. Little Women, Oscar and Lucinda, Mrs Soffel...anybody? Gillian Armstrong.

I have no idea what famous Australian directors I might have missed here, I was just scanning a list. Maybe because directors are faceless we are less aware of them. Now, I'm not quite suggesting that Australian directors are AS famous as our actors, I don't think they are. But still....



( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Match found in the German National Library.
  glsottawa | Apr 4, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
Why is it that writers who take the bleakest view of the human condition - Pascal, Swift, Graham Greene, John le Carré - make such excellent entertainers? ''The Russia House,'' though bleak in its political implications, is essentially an ''entertainment'' in the Graham Greene sense. That is to say it is an exciting spy story, which is at the same time a lively international comedy of manners. The comedy is black, most of the manners being those of spies. The book is also a well-informed, up-to-the-minute political parable, incisive and instructive.
 
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Epigraph
Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that one of these days governments had better get out of the way and let them have it. Dwight D. Eisenhower
One must think like a hero to behave like a merely decent human being.
May Sarto
Dedication
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
For Bob Gottlieb, a great editor and a long suffering friend
First words
In a broad Moscow street not two hundred yards from the Leningrad station, on the upper floor of an ornate and hideous hotel built by Stalin in the style known to Muscovites as Empire During the Plague, the British Council's first ever audio fair for the teaching of the English language and the spread of British culture was grinding to its excruciating end.
Quotations
Todd and Larry were Quinn’s people. They were clean-limbed and pretty and, for a man of my age, ludicrously youthful.
(p 244) ... 'My God, don't tell me he's still around! At his age I wouldn't even buy unripe bananas!'
(p 309) Katya is still free.
Why?
They have not stolen her children, ransacked her flat, thrown Matvey in the madhouse or displayed any of the delicacy traditionally reserved for Russian ladies playing courier to Soviet defence physicists who have decided to entrust their nation's secrets to a derelict Western publisher.
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Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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It is the third summer of perestroika. Barley Blair, London publisher, receives a smuggled document from Moscow. It contains technical information of overwhelming importance. But is it genuine? Is the author genuine? A plant? A madman? Blair, jazz-loving, drink-marinated, dishevelled, is hardly to the taste of the spymasters, yet he has to be used - sent to the Soviet Union to make contact. Katya, the Moscow intermediary, is beautiful, thoughtful, equally sceptical of all state ideology. Together, as the safe clichés of hostility disintegrate, they may represent the future - an idea that is anathema to the entrenched espionage professionals on both sides. THE RUSSIA HOUSE: a spy story, a love story, and a fable for our time.

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Penguin Australia

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