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Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help…
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Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World (original 2005; edition 2005)

by Paul Stamets (Author)

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490739,126 (4.14)5
Growing more mushrooms may be the best thing we can do to save the environment, and mushroom expert Paul Stamets explains how in this groundbreaking manual. The science goes like this: fine filaments of cells called mycelium, the fruit of which are mushrooms, already cover large areas of land around the world. As the mycelium grows, it breaks down plant and animal debris, recycling carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in the creation of rich new soil. What Stamets shows is that the enzymes and acids that mycelium produces to decompose this debris are superb at breaking apart hydrocarbons--the base of many pollutants. Stamets discusses the various branches of this exciting new technology, including mycorestoration (biotransforming stripped land), mycofiltration (creating habitat buffers), myco-remediation (healing chemically harmed environments), and mycoforestry (creating truly sustainable forests)--From publisher description.… (more)
Member:DrunkenThane
Title:Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World
Authors:Paul Stamets (Author)
Info:Ten Speed Press (2005), Edition: Illustrated, 356 pages
Collections:Your library
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Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World by Paul Stamets (2005)

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» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Surprisingly interesting and fun book about mushrooms. Helping to save the world might be a little overblown. It does cover plenty of beneficial and tasty aspects of mushrooms, plus some numerous areas where there has been some research and potential may be lurking (medical, bioremediation, crop yields, etc). After a couple dreamy and somewhat dubious proclamations in the opening chapters it settles down to facts, published research and empirical projects. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
Good book to dip into, but feels a little like an encyclopedia with many many entries on exotic mushrooms that I suspect I may never encounter. ( )
  Beniaminus | Nov 1, 2017 |
Growing more mushrooms may be the best thing we can do to save the environment
  jhawn | Jul 31, 2017 |
Overview

Four kinds of mushrooms:
*Saprophytic - decomposers [primary, secondary, tertiary]
*Parasitic - “blights of the forest or agents for habitat restoration?”
*Mycorrhizal - “fungus and plant partnerships”
*Endophytic - mutualistic, fungal partnerships

Mycorestoration:
*Mycofiltration - filtering out manure
*Mycoforestry - preventing parasitic fungi with other fungi
*Mycoremediation - restoring logging roads, digesting diesel fuel, collecting radiation and heavy metals
*Mycopesticides - ant-proofing your house

Growing Mycelia and Mushrooms:
*Inoculation Methods: Spores, Spawn, and Stem Butts
*Cultivating Mushrooms on Straw and Leached Cow Manure
*Cultivating Mushrooms on Logs and Stumps
*Gardening with Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms
*Nutritional Properties of Mushrooms
*Magnificent Mushrooms: The Cast of Species

Reception

I absolutely loved this book. It’s basically an overview of what a first grader should know about the fungal kingdom. Unfortunately, probably only about 1% of the US population have a rudimentary understanding of mushrooms.

For people who like science: this is your book. Genus and species. Scientific papers. This book is full of science.

For permaculturists: you should read this too. Restoration agriculture. Bioremediation. Ecology.

And for herbalists and healers: mushrooms are your allies! Mushrooms can cure pretty much anything.

Mushrooms are the Wild West right now. Compared to other sectors of the natural world, we know almost nothing about them. Join the pioneers and become a mycologist!

In summary, the subtitle of this book is right on; mushrooms could save the world. ( )
1 vote willszal | Jan 3, 2016 |
Paul Stamets, the mac daddy of mushroom cultivation and science. Mushrooms are important not only to forest life as we know it, but to human life as well.
  rockinchair | Apr 10, 2012 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Paul Stametsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Weil, AndrewForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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There are more species of fungi, bacteria, and protozoa in a single scoop of soil than there are species of plants and vertebrate animals in all of North America.
Preface: For 30 years I have engaged fungi, or perhaps they have engaged me, in a mission to promote the benefits of mushrooms.
Foreward: Mushrooms--ignored by many, reviled by some--may turn out to be important keys to both human health and planetary health.
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Growing more mushrooms may be the best thing we can do to save the environment, and mushroom expert Paul Stamets explains how in this groundbreaking manual. The science goes like this: fine filaments of cells called mycelium, the fruit of which are mushrooms, already cover large areas of land around the world. As the mycelium grows, it breaks down plant and animal debris, recycling carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in the creation of rich new soil. What Stamets shows is that the enzymes and acids that mycelium produces to decompose this debris are superb at breaking apart hydrocarbons--the base of many pollutants. Stamets discusses the various branches of this exciting new technology, including mycorestoration (biotransforming stripped land), mycofiltration (creating habitat buffers), myco-remediation (healing chemically harmed environments), and mycoforestry (creating truly sustainable forests)--From publisher description.

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