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We Were Soldiers Once...And Young: Ia Drang…
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We Were Soldiers Once...And Young: Ia Drang The Battle That Changed the… (original 1993; edition 1992)

by Harold G. Moore (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,282295,812 (4.1)27
Each year, the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps selects one book that he believes is both relevant and timeless for reading by all Marines. The Commandant's choice for 1993 was We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young. In November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore, were dropped by helicopter into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces. Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. How these men persevered--sacrificed themselves for their comrades and never gave up--makes a vivid portrait of war at its most inspiring and devastating. General Moore and Joseph Galloway, the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting, have interviewed hundreds of men who fought there, including the North Vietnamese commanders. This devastating account rises above the specific ordeal it chronicles to present a picture of men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have found unimaginable only a few hours earlier. It reveals to us, as rarely before, man's most heroic and horrendous endeavor.… (more)
Member:Germanicus1
Title:We Were Soldiers Once...And Young: Ia Drang The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam
Authors:Harold G. Moore (Author)
Info:Random House (1992), Edition: 1st, 432 pages
Collections:Your library
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We Were Soldiers Once... and Young: Ia Drang--The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam by Harold G. Moore (1993)

  1. 10
    Vietnam's High Ground: Armed Struggle for the Central Highlands, 1954-1965 (Modern War Studies (Hardcover)) by J. P. Harris (Shrike58)
  2. 00
    The Prince by Jerry Pournelle (bespen, bespen)
    bespen: Pournelle and Stiring's work of fiction covers the same ground of small unit tactics and the ties that men form under combat as Moore and Galloway's classic.
    bespen: Pournelle and Stiring's work of fiction covers the same ground of small unit tactics and the ties that men form under combat as Moore and Galloway's classic.
  3. 11
    A POW's Story: 2801 Days in Hanoi by Col. Larry Guarino (gtown)
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» See also 27 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
freighteningly real. ( )
  LeeFSnyder | Dec 18, 2020 |
I enjoyed this book, but at times it was hard to follow what was going on. I am so sorry for all those poor young men who lost their lives for the sake of politics for the most part. The folks in Washington calling the shots didn't know what they were doing. Everyone was ill-prepared for this type of war, and when they knew what they should be doing, their hands were tied by political motives. So sad. ( )
  SuzieBrown | Jul 21, 2020 |
Heart Breaking.
  Joe73 | Oct 23, 2019 |
Great Book and Movie.
  resuttor76 | Apr 17, 2017 |
Hal Moore is a leader who cares! One can see that in the use of personal information about the men in his unit and the follow up at the end of the book. The book graphically demonstrates that soldiers fight for their buddies and not necessarily for lofty ideals. This was the first air assault engagement by the US Army against the North Vietnamese Army and both sides learned a lot. The North Vietnamese perspective was very good. That said, the reader gets lost in the minutiae and is unable to follow the big picture when he flips back and forth on the myriad and many persons in the book. I skimmed quite a lot--just to get the gist--in those instances. Most interesting to me was the chapter on the impact of the battle from the Army perspective and it's impact on the US' political will. I can't imagine, after such an emotional event, briefing the SECDEF, as LTC Moore did and then having your words just go pfffffftttt. This makes a better movie than a book. ( )
  buffalogr | Oct 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Harold G. Mooreprimary authorall editionscalculated
Galloway, Joseph L.main authorall editionsconfirmed
Davis, JonathanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The small bloody hole in the ground that was Captain Bob Edwards's Charlie Company command post was crowded with men.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Each year, the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps selects one book that he believes is both relevant and timeless for reading by all Marines. The Commandant's choice for 1993 was We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young. In November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore, were dropped by helicopter into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces. Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. How these men persevered--sacrificed themselves for their comrades and never gave up--makes a vivid portrait of war at its most inspiring and devastating. General Moore and Joseph Galloway, the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting, have interviewed hundreds of men who fought there, including the North Vietnamese commanders. This devastating account rises above the specific ordeal it chronicles to present a picture of men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have found unimaginable only a few hours earlier. It reveals to us, as rarely before, man's most heroic and horrendous endeavor.

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