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Middlebrow Moderns by Lisa Botshon
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Middlebrow Moderns (2003)

by Lisa Botshon

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Critics often define the modernist period as the dichotomy between the high culture of edgy literary experimentation and the low culture of dime store novels, gritty detective stories, and other genre fiction, dismissing the significant group of American women writers who negotiated the delicate balance between critical and commercial success. Burdened with the derogatory label middlebrow by the literary elite, these authors of popular fiction nevertheless wrote scores of bestsellers, won awards, and had their works adapted into major Hollywood films. The unique contribution of these middlebrow moderns to early twentieth-century culture is now explored in this pathbreaking collection of original articles. Examining women writers from diverse backgrounds and works from a broad range of media, including literature, magazines, book clubs, advertising, radio, and film, the essayists show how authors such as Winnifred Easton, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Nella Larsen, Anita Loos, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Edna Ferber, and Fannie Hurst bridged gaps in an audience increasingly fragmented by economic, racial, ethnic, and regional differences. A valuable addition to American literary studies, c… (more)

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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lisa Botshonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goldsmith, MeredithEditormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bower, StephanieContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campbell, DonnaContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Churchwell, SarahContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ferens, DominikaContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harker, JaimeContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Honey, MaureenContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kenaga, HeidiContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rubin, Joan ShelleyContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tomlinson, SusanContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williams, DeborahContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Approximately half the copies of this title are cataloged under Lisa Botshon, which is more correct, so anyone who knows how to merge the records is welcome to do so.
Approximately half the copies of this title are cataloged with Joan Shelley Rubin as the author; Lisa Botshon is more correct, so anyone who knows how to merge the records is welcome to do so.
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Critics often define the modernist period as the dichotomy between the high culture of edgy literary experimentation and the low culture of dime store novels, gritty detective stories, and other genre fiction, dismissing the significant group of American women writers who negotiated the delicate balance between critical and commercial success. Burdened with the derogatory label "middlebrow" by the literary elite, these authors of popular fiction nevertheless wrote scores of bestsellers, won awards, and had their works adapted into major Hollywood films. The unique contribution of these "middlebrow moderns" to early twentieth-century culture is now explored in this pathbreaking collection of original articles. Examining women writers from diverse backgrounds and works from a broad range of media, including literature, magazines, book clubs, advertising, radio, and film, the essayists show how authors such as Winnifred Easton, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Nella Larsen, Anita Loos, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Edna Ferber, and Fannie Hurst bridged gaps in an audience increasingly fragmented by economic, racial, ethnic, and regional differences. A valuable addition to American literary studies, cultural studies, and women's history, Middlebrow Moderns also illuminates today's gendered culture wars. [retrieved 9/27/17 from Amazon.com]

Contents:
Written with a hard and ruthless purpose : Rose Wilder Lane, Edna Ferber and middlebrow regional fiction / Donna Campbell -- The cosmopolitan regionalism of Zona Gale's Friendship Village / Deborah Williams -- Winnifred Eaton's "Japanese" novels as a field experiment / Dominika Ferens -- Feminist new woman fiction in periodicals of the 1920's / Maureen Honey -- Progressive middlebrow : Dorothy Canfield, women's magazines, and popular feminism in the twenties / Jaime Harker -- Lost among the ads : Gentlemen prefer blondes and the politics of imitation / Sarah Churchwell -- Edna Ferber's Cimarron, cultural authority, and 1920s western historical narratives / Heidi Kenaga -- Anzia Yezierska and the marketing of the Jewish immigrant in 1920s Hollywood / Lisa Botshon -- An unwonted coquetry : the commercial seductions of Jessie Fauset's The chinaberry tree / Susan Tomlinson -- The wages of virtue : consumerism and class formation in Fannie Hurst's Back street / Stephanie Bower -- Shopping to pass, passing to shop : consumer self-fashioning in the fiction of Nella Larsen / Meredith Goldsmith.
Critics often define the modernist period as the dichotomy between the high culture of edgy literary experimentation and the low culture of dime store novels, gritty detective stories, and other genre fiction, dismissing the significant group of American women writers who negotiated the delicate balance between critical and commercial success. Burdened with the derogatory label "middlebrow" by the literary elite, these authors of popular fiction nevertheless wrote scores of bestsellers, won awards, and had their works adapted into major Hollywood films. The unique contribution of these "middlebrow moderns" to early twentieth-century culture is now explored in this pathbreaking collection of original articles. Examining women writers from diverse backgrounds and works from a broad range of media, including literature, magazines, book clubs, advertising, radio, and film, the essayists show how authors such as Winnifred Easton, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Nella Larsen, Anita Loos, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Edna Ferber, and Fannie Hurst bridged gaps in an audience increasingly fragmented by economic, racial, ethnic, and regional differences. A valuable addition to American literary studies, cultural studies, and women's history, Middlebrow Moderns also illuminates today's gendered culture wars. [retrieved 9/27/17 from Amazon.com]

Contents:
Written with a hard and ruthless purpose : Rose Wilder Lane, Edna Ferber and middlebrow regional fiction / Donna Campbell -- The cosmopolitan regionalism of Zona Gale's Friendship Village / Deborah Williams -- Winnifred Eaton's "Japanese" novels as a field experiment / Dominika Ferens -- Feminist new woman fiction in periodicals of the 1920's / Maureen Honey -- Progressive middlebrow : Dorothy Canfield, women's magazines, and popular feminism in the twenties / Jaime Harker -- Lost among the ads : Gentlemen prefer blondes and the politics of imitation / Sarah Churchwell -- Edna Ferber's Cimarron, cultural authority, and 1920s western historical narratives / Heidi Kenaga -- Anzia Yezierska and the marketing of the Jewish immigrant in 1920s Hollywood / Lisa Botshon -- An unwonted coquetry : the commercial seductions of Jessie Fauset's The chinaberry tree / Susan Tomlinson -- The wages of virtue : consumerism and class formation in Fannie Hurst's Back street / Stephanie Bower -- Shopping to pass, passing to shop : consumer self-fashioning in the fiction of Nella Larsen / Meredith Goldsmith.
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