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The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
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The Last Lecture (original 2008; edition 2008)

by Randy Pausch (Author)

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8,497292738 (4.02)189
"We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand." -- Randy Pausch. A lot of professors give talks titled "The last lecture." Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them. And while they speak, audiences can't help but mull the same question: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave -- "Really achieving your childhood dreams" -- wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because "time is all you have ... and you may find one day that you have less than you think"). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living.… (more)
Member:Hannah17C
Title:The Last Lecture
Authors:Randy Pausch (Author)
Info:Hyperion (2008), Edition: 1st, 206 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch (2008)

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» See also 189 mentions

English (281)  Italian (5)  Catalan (1)  Swedish (1)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (291)
Showing 1-5 of 281 (next | show all)
Loving the optimism shown in this book, though Randy was unwell, he has definitely opened up my mind a lot!

Here's my full review:
http://www.sholee.net/2018/01/mpov-last-lecture.html ( )
  Sholee | Sep 9, 2021 |
Beyond inspiring and a very quick read, I picked this up based on the recommendation of a friend. Mr. Pausch's amazing journey is one that makes you think about the important things in life and how to make the most of the time you have. As it is derived from an actual lecture, the book has a conversational tone that allows you to truly connect to the story. You'll walk away with a bit of a smile but finding yourself moved in some incredibly emotional ways. ( )
  crtsjffrsn | Aug 27, 2021 |
[b:The Last Lecture|40611510|The Last Lecture|Randy Pausch|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1529682044l/40611510._SX50_.jpg|3364076] is quite a book.

It hits all the harder reading it for the first time now, knowing that Randy Pausch died a year after this lecture/book came out, but even that was a decade ago. His children are in high school/college now. His wife Jai eventually remarried. Some things change and move on. Some don't.

There is a lot of good advice in this book and a lot of stories that really make you think. Conversely, there are quite a few of the sections wherein you realize just how lucky and, to some sense, privileged Randy Pausch was. Always carry $200 in your wallet? A life of well connected mentors and friends (that he helped to cultivate, granted)? He's also very much an engineer. It shows both in how he looks at the world and how he tackles life.

So overall, Randy Pausch sounds like a good man. He cared about his family and tried to do the best he could with a crappy situation. It's not necessarily a book for life advice, but it is an interesting read.

Really, the one thing is should do is make you wonder: what would my Last Lecture be like? ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
Not exactly a feel-good book, since the author is dying and leaving behind a young family, but contains good reminders of living life to its fullest, and focusing on what's important in life. ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
I listened to this on audio. What an amazing book. I cried throughout, but especially during the last three or so chapters, when he was talking about how he was preparing for his death, what he was doing for his wife and children. Makes you want to go home and hug all of your family. And maybe never let go. ( )
  ssperson | Apr 3, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 281 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Randy Pauschprimary authorall editionscalculated
Zaslow, Jeffreysecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Singer, ErikNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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With thanks to my parents who allowed me to dream, and with hopes for the dreams my children will have.
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I have an engineering problem.
Quotations
...The brick walls are there to stop the people who don't want it badly enough. They're there to stop the "other" people. -p 73
Self esteem? He knew there was really only one way to teach kids how to develop it: You give them something they can’t do, they work hard until they find they can do it, and you just keep repeating the process.”
Not everything needs to be fixed.
Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand." -- Randy Pausch. A lot of professors give talks titled "The last lecture." Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them. And while they speak, audiences can't help but mull the same question: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave -- "Really achieving your childhood dreams" -- wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because "time is all you have ... and you may find one day that you have less than you think"). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living.

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