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The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of…
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The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the Origins of the Ebola Virus (original 1994; edition 1995)

by Richard Preston (Author)

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5,2621081,522 (4.04)157
A highly infectious, deadly virus from the central African rain forest suddenly appears in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. There is no cure. In a few days 90 percent of its victims are dead. A secret military SWAT team of soldiers and scientists is mobilized to stop the outbreak of this virus. The book tells this dramatic story, giving an account of the appearance of rare and lethal viruses and their "crashes" into the human race.… (more)
Member:mifoley119
Title:The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the Origins of the Ebola Virus
Authors:Richard Preston (Author)
Info:Anchor (1995), Edition: 1, 448 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story by Richard Preston (1994)

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» See also 157 mentions

English (103)  Danish (2)  German (1)  All languages (106)
Showing 1-5 of 103 (next | show all)
I picked this book up for the bargain price of £1 at a local charity store after it was recommended by a work colleague. Even though it is a previous best seller I had never heard of it, the author or the incident involved. I had a little bit of knowledge on Ebola but I had no idea that it was a deadly as it is.

I was warned that some people find the book a bit horrific but I was sure that it wouldn't bother me as gory stuff doesn't normally affect me. I have to say however that the first section of the book had my skin crawling and played with my head a bit when I trying to sleep. I think it was down to the fact that 90% of the people who get Ebola die in a horrible way and it can be very very easy to catch.

I also found the details about the investigations into where the viruses had originated from fascinating. As usual with this kind of work there are a few very specialist people around the world and that is it. You tend not to think about the human stories behind these people and this book gives you just enough to make it interesting without getting bogged down in useless details.

The final section is all about a breakout of Ebola in America, an event that could have changed the world on a scale bigger than 9/11. How close the human race came to being in a real bad way is terrifying. I just had to keep reading until I had finished because the story reads like a thriller. It is true that sometimes truth is stranger than fiction.

The only negative I have with the book is that the writing doesn't flow off the page quite like it could. Despite this I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the subject ( )
  Brian. | Jun 20, 2021 |
Descriptions were truly horrific, the book is a little outdated because I think they have a vaccine now, or if not they do have a way to treat it. Suspense was well done, kept me reading. ( )
  FurbyKirby | Jan 5, 2021 |
"Perhaps the biosphere does not like the idea of 5 billion humans....Nature has interesting ways to balance itself"

I absolutely LOVE this book as terrifying as it is to read about killer virus Ebola. The book with all its detail was much scarier than the mini series, The Hot Zone on National Geographic channel. I'm shocked at how the virus was handled and surprised that many experts cut themselves while studying an infected liver or other organs. Poke yourself with a bloody needle ...


( )
  xKayx | Dec 14, 2020 |
I've read this book four or five times, the first time when I was around 15 or so. It is intense, gripping, and a fantastic read from beginning to end. It left me with a lifelong fascination/fear of Ebola. Thanks to Mr. Preston I will never forget the image of someone bleeding from every orifice... but in a good way? ( )
  b_coli | Nov 25, 2020 |
A remarkable story about an ebola virus that traveled to the U.S. - and to near Washington, D.C., for that matter.

The story begins earlier, however. The Marburg virus was discovered in 1967. It was the first of the "hot" viruses, originating in Africa, that jumped from monkey to human. These viruses destroy the insides of the body, leaving little but blood behind. The tale continues with information about the Ebola viruses, a more deadly but similar type of "string" virus - so called because of its stringy appearance under magnification. While these viruses are simple, containing just seven proteins, some of the proteins are unknown.

The outbreak near Washington took place in 1989 in Reston, Virginia, at a "monkey house", a commercial venture that imported monkeys to be sold to other companies. One shipment came in and the consulting veterinarian began to see some unusual behavior in some of the monkeys. Then some of them died. He donned some protective gear and cut into some dead monkeys and took some samples from the spleen. What he saw there caused him some concern, and he began, cautiously, to contact appropriate authorities.

We then learn of the Army and the Centers for Disease Control finding a way to split control of a possible outbreak of a deadly virus. What went right, what went wrong, and what could have gone even more wrong. It's a remarkable story of viruses, science, history, and both human error and human courage. It's not fiction but it almost reads like it is, and it should scare anyone who reads it. ( )
  slojudy | Sep 8, 2020 |
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» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard Prestonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Davidson, Richard M.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rietz, Hans Dusecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
The second angel poored his bowl into the sea, and it became like the blood of a dead man. --Apocalypse
Dedication
To Frederic Delano Grant, Jr., admired by all who knew him.
First words
1980 New Year's Day: Charles Monet was a loner.
Quotations
The kill rate in humans infected with Ebola Zaire is nine out of ten. Ninety percent of the people who come down with Ebola Zaire die of it. Ebola Zaire is a slate wiper in humans.
You can't fight off Ebola the way you fight off a cold.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Be careful when combining a book titled Virus with the author's last name of Preston. Both Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child AND Richard Preston have a book with this title.
ISBN 9024537193 is actually by Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child; not Richard Preston.
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A highly infectious, deadly virus from the central African rain forest suddenly appears in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. There is no cure. In a few days 90 percent of its victims are dead. A secret military SWAT team of soldiers and scientists is mobilized to stop the outbreak of this virus. The book tells this dramatic story, giving an account of the appearance of rare and lethal viruses and their "crashes" into the human race.

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