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Guy Mannering by Walter Scott
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Guy Mannering (original 1815; edition 1999)

by Walter Scott (Author), P. D. Garside (Editor)

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455839,481 (3.86)34
Guy Mannering is an astrologer who only half-believes in his art. Instead he places his faith in patriarchal power, wealth and social position. But the Scotland of this novel is a nation in which the old hierarchies are breaking down and Guy must learn the limits of the nabob's authority in a society in which each social group - from gypsies and smugglers, to Edinburgh lawyers, landowners and Border store farmers - lives by its own laws.… (more)
Member:AlanaAssimina
Title:Guy Mannering
Authors:Walter Scott (Author)
Other authors:P. D. Garside (Editor)
Info:Edinburgh University Press (1999), 560 pages
Collections:Untitled collection
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Tags:Classic Novel

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Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott (Author) (1815)

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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
The second published novel of Walter Scott. Apparently written in 6 weeks when Scott needed to raise funds urgently when in a financial crisis, the book holds together remarkably well.
The plot is of its era, and slightly unrealistic - the heir, kidnapped as a child, returns as a man, not knowing his heritage, and rights the wrongs. But there are a couple of interesting features: although the book is subtitled "The Astrologer", astrology is not given much credence; and the "Gypsy queen" is given a generous treatment in the plot.
A rollickingly good yarn, more complex and nuanced that expected from a rushed production. ( )
  mbmackay | Aug 10, 2018 |
This is the second novel written by Walter Scott, and arguably better than his first one Waverley.
Set mainly in the rural Galloway region of Scotland in the late 1700s, Guy Mannering tells us a story of Gipsies, smugglers, kidnap, lost identity, love interests, a dispossed Laird and his lost heir. The cast of characters is one of the best in any novel. For example the Gipsy woman Meg Merrilies carries such a strong personality and image that she has achieved immortality beyond these pages in the popular imagination. Keats also wrote a poem based on her. Likewise, the smuggler Dirk Hatteraick is archetypal in his role of desparate incorrigible rogue. Scott even manages to make memorable characters out of the eccentric and socially awkward chaplain, and the lawyer.
Though the plot is somewhat predictable in its overall arch, it is still a tense tale in its scenes and happenings, with enough clever interweavings and twists that it doesn't get boring. As a romantic tale of picturesque quality, it would be a great introduction to Scott's novels. ( )
  P_S_Patrick | Jan 31, 2018 |
Not the adventuresome type of novel one usually associates with Scott, the era of castles and pitched battles is long past and the hero is bedeviled by smugglers and gypsies rather than religious fanatics or enemy knights. I enjoyed it.
  ritaer | Mar 1, 2014 |
Like The Bride of Lammermoor, this is a novel worth reading in spite of a totally preposterous storyline, simply because of the quality of Scott's writing. Just let all that business of astrologers, missing heirs and mysterious gypsy women drift by you and enjoy the magnificent detailing, the Galloway scenery, the incomparable Border farmer Dandie Dinmont, and a brilliant thumbnail sketch of Enlightenment Edinburgh.

(I read this a few years ago, but forgot to catalogue it at the time) ( )
  thorold | May 24, 2012 |
883 Guy Mannering, by Sir Walter Scott (read 11 Dec 1966) Faster than Waverley, I believe I read it more avidly . Full of plot, rather predictable, yet it catches one up. As one reflects, it seems silly--but during the telling this is not true. Gypsies, smugglers, lost heir, curses, etc., are the ingredients for an interest-filled tale: "The grey old towers of the ruin, partly entire, partly broken, here bearing the rusty weather-stains of ages, and there partially mantled with ivy, stretched along the verges of the dark rock which rose on Mannering's right hand. In his front was the quiet bay, whose little waves, crisping and sparkling to the moonbeams, rolled successively..."! ( )
  Schmerguls | Jan 21, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Scott, Sir WalterAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tafel, LeonhardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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'Tis said that words and signs have power
O'er sprites in planetary hour;
But scarce I praise their venturous part,
Who tamper with such dangerous art.
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Guy Mannering is an astrologer who only half-believes in his art. Instead he places his faith in patriarchal power, wealth and social position. But the Scotland of this novel is a nation in which the old hierarchies are breaking down and Guy must learn the limits of the nabob's authority in a society in which each social group - from gypsies and smugglers, to Edinburgh lawyers, landowners and Border store farmers - lives by its own laws.

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