HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Game (King, Laurie R) by Laurie R. King
Loading...

The Game (King, Laurie R) (original 2004; edition 2004)

by Laurie R. King

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,863513,722 (4.01)54
Member:Topsy
Title:The Game (King, Laurie R)
Authors:Laurie R. King
Info:Bantam (2004), Hardcover, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fiction, comfort reading, mystery, Sherlock Holmes, at home

Work details

The Game by Laurie R. King (2004)

Recently added byErina39, ElizabethD94, lollynoses
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 54 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
enough with this series......... ( )
  kmajort | Feb 9, 2018 |
$1.99 on Amazon today!

1924. Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes gets a New Year’s visit from Mycroft Holmes with a strange package from an English spy called Kimball O’Hara, more known as the Kim Kipling wrote about. He has withdrawn from the “Great Game” of espionage and disappeared. So Russell and Homes travels to India to search for the missing Kim.

I like this book very much, a missing spy, India and Mary Russell that has to disguise herself to save Sherlock Holmes. It's a wonderful entertaining and engrossing book.
( )
  MaraBlaise | Dec 14, 2017 |
I really love the way Miss King reates a setting, within a timeframe long gone. Her use of language long forgotten or the manners with which one used in company- simply wonderful. As you read one can tell the care she takes with her deatls and it is well worth it.

The Game allows our female heroine to explore on her own for a bit without her husband. She as a character gets to grow and we see her observations not through her husband's interpretations, but of hers alone. A well written tome, with interesting personages thrown in the mix. All in all, it was a fun jaunt through India (well for me at least, some characters fared much better than others). ( )
  lollyletsgo | Aug 10, 2017 |
I am not complaining about this book, as Laurie R. King has managed to realistically draw a fictional picture of 'The Game' in India. What is the Game? This expression is used in the Mary Russell books as a metaphor for spying. Like a John Le Carré novel featuring George Smiley, there is a jargon to be followed, but not quite to his extent. Here we follow the Holmeses to India, where social unrest and internal wars are rife. The mad maharadja's background and psychological blackmail is well rendered, using the guests as virtual prisoners to heighten narrative tension. However, using Kim (fictional character) as the mysterious character who needs rescuing is a bit too much - it could have been someone else with a much more clear importance to justify rescuing. The reason for rescuing him were, if anything, fuzzy and this messed up his characterisation. The latter was nearly a caricature, turning Kim from a very clever (gone native) spy into a silly born-again buddhist convert. This character seemed too far-fetched in an otherwise flawless adventure. Nonetheless, this is a good book in the Holmeses adventures. This book is good to read, if only to be taken with a pinch of salt in places. ( )
  soniaandree | May 2, 2017 |
It was January 1, 1924, when Mycroft Holmes, recovering from an illness, called his brother Sherlock and his wife, Mary Russell, to London. The government had recently changed and it wanted to investigate the disappearance of Kimball O’Mara, (famous as the title character in Rudyard Kipling’s book KIM. When last heard of, he had been in India. Some British agents had been eliminated and there was also concern about the rising influence of the Communists. Mycroft asked Shelock and Mary to travel to India to learn what they could.
Mary is the narrator of the story and describes not only of the characters, scenery, and buildings but also of the food and clothing. In some cases, she contrasts it with what they had seen on previous adventures. For example: “It was...both like our wandering time in Palestine and yet very different. Most of the difference lay in the population density.”
THE GAME refers not only to the intelligence community but also to the role of sporting events, particularly between the British and the Indians. Among the people they meet are a family from the United States and a Maharaja in India, with whom she spent several days in his magnificent home. Among the activities he offered to his guests was pig sticking. When one member of the American trio suggested having a world cup for pig sticking, the maharaja replied, “The British do not need to train for sticking pig. They simply arrange the rules to their satisfaction.”
Laurie King has excellent command of language and presents wonderful oral visions descriptions: “My sacrifice was to be the climax of the evening’s events, and he had worked the crowd into a near frenzy, playing on their rustic gullibility as on a fine instrument.”
The book is adventure with some history thrown in to put it into context. As always, Laurie King’s writing is very detailed though, at times, seemed to drag. It is, however, an excellent addition to the series. ( )
  Judiex | Mar 9, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Laurie R. Kingprimary authorall editionscalculated
Sterlin, JennyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Is a (non-series) sequel to

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For the librarians everywhere, who spend their lives in battle against the forces of darkness.
First words
It was a dramatic setting for a human sacrifice, give my murderer credit.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553583387, Mass Market Paperback)

Laurie R. King’s bestselling mystery series featuring Mary Russell and her husband and partner, Sherlock Holmes, is beloved by readers and acclaimed by critics the world over. Now the illustrious duo returns for their most dangerous exploit yet, in a rich and atmospheric tale that takes them to India to save the life of one of literature’s most fabled heroes.

It’s the second day of the new year, 1924, and Mary Russell is settling in for a much-needed rest with her husband, Sherlock Holmes. But the fragile peace will be fleeting—for a visit with Holmes’s gravely ill brother, Mycroft, brings news of an intrigue that is sure to halt their respite. Mycroft, who has ties to the highest levels of the government, has just received a strange package. The oilskin-wrapped packet contains the papers of a missing English spy named Kimball O’Hara—indeed, the same Kimball who served as the inspiration for Rudyard Kipling’s famed Kim.
An orphaned English boy turned loose in India, Kim long used his cunning to spy for the Crown. But after inexplicably withdrawing from the “Great Game” of border espionage, he’s gone missing and is feared taken hostage—or even killed.

When Russell learns of Holmes’s own secret friendship with Kim some thirty years before, she knows the die is cast: she will accompany her husband to India to search for the missing operative. But even before they arrive, danger will show its face in everything from a suspicious passenger on board their steamer to an “accident” that very nearly claims their lives. Once in India, Russell and Holmes must travel incognito—no small task for the English lady and her lanky companion. But after a twist of fate forces the couple to part ways, Russell learns that in this faraway place it’s often impossible to tell friend from foe—and that some games must be played out until their deadly end.

Showcasing King’s masterful plotting and skill at making history leap from the page, The Game brings alive an India fraught with unrest and poised for change—and an unpredictable mystery with brilliance and character to match.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:31 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

"It's the second day of the new year, 1924, and Mary Russell is settling in for a much-needed rest with her husband, Sherlock Holmes. But the fragile peace will be fleeting - for a visit with Holmes's gravely ill brother, Mycroft, brings new of an intrigue that is sure to halt their respite." "Mycroft, who has ties to the highest levels of the government, has just received a strange package. The oilskin-wrapped packet contains the papers of a missing English spy named Kimball O'Hara - indeed, the same Kimball who served as the inspiration for Rudyard Kipling's famed Kim. An orphaned English boy turned loose in India, Kim long used his cunning to spy for the Crown. But after inexplicably withdrawing from the "Great Game" of border espionage, he's gone missing and is feared taken hostage - or even killed." "When Russell learns of Holmes' own secret friendship with Kim some thirty years before, she knows the die is cast: she will accompany her husband to India to search for the missing operative. But even before they arrive, danger will show its face in everything from a suspicious passenger on board their steamer to an "accident" that very nearly claims their lives." "Once in India, Russell and Holmes must travel incognito - no small task for the English lady and her lanky companion. But after a twist of fate forces the couple to part ways, Russell learns that in this faraway place it's often impossible to tell friend from foe - and that some games must be played out until their deadly end."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.01)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 11
2.5 4
3 81
3.5 27
4 227
4.5 23
5 120

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,385,114 books! | Top bar: Always visible