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The Hotel New Hampshire by John Irving
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The Hotel New Hampshire (original 1981; edition 2018)

by John Irving (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
6,815671,048 (3.86)2 / 133
""The first of my father's illusions was that bears could survive the life lived by human beings, and the second was that human beings could survive a life led in hotels.""So says John Berry, son of a hapless dreamer, brother to a cadre of eccentric siblings, and chronicler of the lives lived, the loves experienced, the deaths met, and the myriad strange and wonderful times encountered by the family Berry. Hoteliers, pet-bear owners, friends of Freud (the animal trainer and vaudevillian, that is), and playthings of mad fate, they "dream on" in a funny, sad, outrageous, and moving novel by the remarkable author of "A Widow for One Year" and "The Cider House Rules."… (more)
Member:mrschacon
Title:The Hotel New Hampshire
Authors:John Irving (Author)
Info:Dutton (2018), Edition: Reprint, 432 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Hotel New Hampshire by John Irving (1981)

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English (58)  German (3)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (2)  Danish (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (67)
Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
This book was funny and at times had a lot of heart, but the big middle part dragged on, and I felt uneasy with Irving's treatment of both race and another (avoiding spoilers here) central sort of trauma in the book. I'm not sure they're bad treatments, but they did make me feel uneasy. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
Enjoyed reading parts of hotel #1, overall disgusted with hotel #2, and understood the story by hotel #3. Like how the dog Sorrow kept showing up, the thinking of the Coach Bob and the idea of going past open windows, how Lily tried to grow by writing, how Frank the oldest brother handled what life gave him, and the optimism of the Father trying to make the best of whatever crossed his path. Could not like the absurd behaviors of Franny and her brother the narrator nor the lives of those living in hotel #2. Interesting how every incident had an importance to the overall story and how all the main characters lives were affected by those incidents. ( )
  kshydog | Dec 13, 2020 |
Maybe I'm one of those people that doesn't get John Irving. About 3/4s of the way I couldn't wait to get rid of these odd balls from my head. ( )
  charlie68 | Jul 15, 2020 |
The first half of this book was greatness. Then it started to get a little bit sluggish. Then there was some dramatic action. Followed by some really messed up bits. The conclusion was satisfactory. ( )
  tntbeckyford | Feb 16, 2019 |
This is a strange book. On the one hand it's interesting, but on the other very boring. I'm not so very interested in the family and also not in the individual members of it.
It took me quite some time to get through and now I'm happy I've finished. ( )
  BoekenTrol71 | Jul 24, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
Like a fairy tale - and Irving reminds us with tireless zeal that his novel is a fairy tale -''The Hotel New Hampshire'' is both fanciful and cruel. The Berry family is oddly susceptible to disaster; suicides, airplane crashes, blindings by terrorist bombs abound. Nor is this feisty crew beyond wreaking havoc among themselves. ''To each other, we were as normal and nice as the smell of bread, we were just a family,'' observes the narrator (named John, in the autobiographical fashion of the day); but sibling incest is a dominant motif, and their incessant colloquys are conducted in a language heavy with insult and innuendo.
 

» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Irving, Johnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hermann, HansTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rikman, KristiinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For my wife Shyla,

whose love provided

the light

and the space

for five novels
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The summer my father bought the bear, none of us was born - we weren't even conceived: not Frank, the oldest; not Franny, the loudest; not me, the next; and not the youngest of us, Lilly and Egg.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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""The first of my father's illusions was that bears could survive the life lived by human beings, and the second was that human beings could survive a life led in hotels.""So says John Berry, son of a hapless dreamer, brother to a cadre of eccentric siblings, and chronicler of the lives lived, the loves experienced, the deaths met, and the myriad strange and wonderful times encountered by the family Berry. Hoteliers, pet-bear owners, friends of Freud (the animal trainer and vaudevillian, that is), and playthings of mad fate, they "dream on" in a funny, sad, outrageous, and moving novel by the remarkable author of "A Widow for One Year" and "The Cider House Rules."

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