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From Myth to Reason?: Studies in the Development of Greek Thought

by Richard Buxton

Other authors: Mireille Bélis (Contributor), Jan Bremmer (Contributor), Walter Burkert (Contributor), Claude Calame (Contributor), John Gould (Contributor)12 more, Fritz Graf (Contributor), Alan Griffiths (Contributor), François Hartog (Contributor), Albert Henrichs (Contributor), Thomas K. Johansen (Contributor), Dominique Lenfant (Contributor), Geoffrey Lloyd (Contributor), Glenn W. Most (Contributor), Penelope Murray (Contributor), Christopher Rowe (Contributor), Jacob Stern (Contributor), Sitta von Reden (Contributor)

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It has often been asserted that Greek civilization underwent a transition from myth to reason. But what does such an assertion mean? And how much truth is there in it? Were the Greeks special in having evolved our sort of reason, or is that a mirage?In this book, some of the world's leading experts on ancient Greek myth, religion, philosophy, and history reconsider these fundamental issues. Among the problems they explore are: the history of the Mythos/Logos opposition; myth and reason in practice; logic(s) of myth; intersections involvingmyth/philosophy, myth/history, myth/ethnography, and myth/technology. Some contributors are more sceptical than others about whether the myth/reason polarity has any future as a tool for the understanding of Greek society - or any society. But what they all agree on is that a reconsideration ofthe Greek case can help us to clarify much broader debates, for example the debate about the cross-cultural viability (or not) of myth and reason/rationality.… (more)

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard Buxtonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bélis, MireilleContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bremmer, JanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Burkert, WalterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Calame, ClaudeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gould, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Graf, FritzContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Griffiths, AlanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hartog, FrançoisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Henrichs, AlbertContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Johansen, Thomas K.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lenfant, DominiqueContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lloyd, GeoffreyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Most, Glenn W.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Murray, PenelopeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rowe, ChristopherContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Stern, JacobContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
von Reden, SittaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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It has often been asserted that Greek civilization underwent a transition from myth to reason. But what does such an assertion mean? And how much truth is there in it? Were the Greeks special in having evolved our sort of reason, or is that a mirage?In this book, some of the world's leading experts on ancient Greek myth, religion, philosophy, and history reconsider these fundamental issues. Among the problems they explore are: the history of the Mythos/Logos opposition; myth and reason in practice; logic(s) of myth; intersections involvingmyth/philosophy, myth/history, myth/ethnography, and myth/technology. Some contributors are more sceptical than others about whether the myth/reason polarity has any future as a tool for the understanding of Greek society - or any society. But what they all agree on is that a reconsideration ofthe Greek case can help us to clarify much broader debates, for example the debate about the cross-cultural viability (or not) of myth and reason/rationality.

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