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Seeing Voices by Oliver Sacks
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Seeing Voices (original 1989; edition 2000)

by Oliver Sacks

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1,3132310,266 (3.7)24
Imaginative and insightful, Seeing Voices offers a way into a world that is, for many people, alien and unfamiliar - for to be profoundly deaf is not just to live in a world of silence, but also to live in a world where the visual is paramount. In this remarkable book, Oliver Sacks explores the consequences of this, including the different ways in which the deaf and the hearing learn to categorise their respective worlds - and how they convey and communicate those experiences to others.… (more)
Member:ScienceHouse
Title:Seeing Voices
Authors:Oliver Sacks
Info:Vintage (2000), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 240 pages
Collections:Your library
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Seeing Voices by Oliver Sacks (1989)

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Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
This book is pretty old at this point, there are newer books with newer science in them re: the neuroscience of language and sign language in particular. And there was a lot of blah blah about how what the mother does or doesn't do for their infant can make or break them, as if fathers do not a thing to influence child development. But, I like Sacks' style, and I really liked the third part of the book where he describes being on the Gallaudet campus for the Deaf president protests. A great moment in history. ( )
  katebrarian | Jul 28, 2020 |
Oliver Sacks takes a look at deaf people in this book. There are three sections. The first one focuses on history (how deaf people were treated, communicated with (if at all), etc.), the second on the brain/psychology/science, and the third on deaf culture, with a focus on a deaf university.

It was ok. I don’t know anyone who is deaf, but I was always interested in sign language, at least from high school, when a friend and I got a book out of the library to try to teach ourselves. I later (15-20 years ago) did take an actual class. But, the book itself – some parts were interesting, particularly the culture/university section, but I found other parts quite dry (the middle section). The book is short; almost half of it is Notes. ( )
  LibraryCin | Apr 28, 2020 |
Oliver Sacks is great at gaining a reader's interest through his depiction of patients he has worked with. This book, as compared to Anthropologist on Mars and The Man Who Mistook Wife for a Hat, seemed far less focused on his case studies and was therefore a slightly less interesting read for me. That being said, I do plan on reading more about current systems of education for the deaf as well to compare the world that Sacks was writing about with the current situation. ( )
  Freya_Jane | Jan 4, 2020 |
This was interesting as far as it went - which was 30 years ago. It could use an update. ( )
  MarthaJeanne | Oct 10, 2019 |
Sacks' several essays on deafness, though the most interesting is the section on the efforts by Gallaudet University students to ensure the hiring of a deaf president in 1988. Quite good. ( )
  JBD1 | Aug 5, 2019 |
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Epigraph
[Sign language] is, in the hands of its masters, a most beautiful and expressive language, for which, in their intercourse with each other and as a means of easily and quickly reaching the minds of the deaf, neither nature nor art has given them a satisfactory substitute.
It is impossible for those who do not understand it to comprehend its possibilities with the deaf, its powerful influence on the moral and social happiness of those deprived of hearing, and its wonderful power of carrying thought to intellects which would otherwise be in perpetual darkness. Nor can they appreciate the hold it has upon the deaf. So long as there are two deaf people upon the face of the earth and they get together, so long will signs be in use.
--J. Schuyler Long
Head teacher, Iowa School for the Deaf
The Sign Language (1910)
Dedication
For Isabelle Rapin, Bob Johnson, Bob Silvers, and Kate Edgar
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We are remarkably ignorant about deafness, which Dr. Johnson called "one of the most desperate of human calamities"--much more ignorant than an educated man would have been in 1886, or 1786.
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Imaginative and insightful, Seeing Voices offers a way into a world that is, for many people, alien and unfamiliar - for to be profoundly deaf is not just to live in a world of silence, but also to live in a world where the visual is paramount. In this remarkable book, Oliver Sacks explores the consequences of this, including the different ways in which the deaf and the hearing learn to categorise their respective worlds - and how they convey and communicate those experiences to others.

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