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Eu, Robô by Isaac Asimov
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Eu, Robô (original 1950; edition 1970)

by Isaac Asimov

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14,995270365 (3.98)382
The three laws of Robotics: 1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm 2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law. With these three, simple directives, Isaac Asimov changed our perception of robots forever when he formulated the laws governing their behavior. In I, Robot, Asimov chronicles the development of the robot through a series of interlinked stories: from its primitive origins in the present to its ultimate perfection in the not-so-distant future--a future in which humanity itself may be rendered obsolete. Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world--all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asmiov's trademark.… (more)
Member:jgcorrea
Title:Eu, Robô
Authors:Isaac Asimov
Info:Fawcett Crest (1970), Paperback
Collections:the 1,001 best books
Rating:****1/2
Tags:novel(la)

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I, Robot by Isaac Asimov (1950)

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» See also 382 mentions

English (245)  Spanish (7)  Danish (3)  Italian (2)  Dutch (2)  French (2)  Catalan (2)  Swedish (2)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Portuguese (1)  German (1)  All languages (268)
Showing 1-5 of 245 (next | show all)
Ich gestehe, ich bin ein bisschen enttäuscht... ( )
  Katzenkindliest | Apr 23, 2024 |
ATTENTION SPOILERS!!!

No doubt, influence of Isaac Asimov and "I, Robot" in particular to the sci-fi genre is huge.
The three rules, defined in this book literally formed the basis for describing AI and robot in sci-fi literature and has been referenced thousand times by different authors.
"I, Robot" is definitely one of the gems of the genre and it's "must read" for everyone interested in science fiction and robotics.
But with all said, there are still some inconsistencies that I noticed.
The first thing that drags attention and makes you say "Whaaat?" is how robots from the novel are described as black boxes. No one knows what's going on inside their mind and all they can do is assumptions from investigation of their behavior. Whereas it should be possible to interfere with their thinking process by altering this "positronic field". Because it's program after all. There is some code, controlling the behavior of these robots, and it should be possible to alter this code, change some lines, make robot do whatever you want. I understand that it's AI and made to be autonomous, but anyway, it'd be stupid not to leave some backdoors to control them in the case of emergency. I mean they are made by human for human, right? Think of our current driverless cars; We can switch down the autopilot and take manual control at any moment.
Another manifestation of the same issue is how they communicate with robots. It's verbal only! We see some moments where doctor Calvin chooses words and expressions to talk to a brain in order to keep it from paradox and malfunction. That's not how robots work in real. Of course, verbal communication is more fancy and user friendly but in such scientific projects like development of hyper-drive, there should be more advanced ways of communicating (like through a console by writing a code).
The part where the Brain builds a space ship with hyperdrive was ridiculous. I mean, it couldn't have been built only by robots. Where were all the building materials and supplies coming from? Why no one knows the principles of how this hyperdrive works? Even after it's been built. It's like they didn't care about how it's gonna be working, they were just waiting there until the thing will be ready. Doesn't seem much scientific, does it?
Second thing that make the book less believable is the world politics and economy. World divided to global regions, governed by Coordinators. We can find it at pretty much every sci-fi book about future. But we see that the real world gets more divided and separated, number of military conflicts are at the same level as 50 years ago. World economy at the book is controlled by so called Machines which define the economical plan for production of all the goods. That's some communist economy that didn't prove itself and I don't thing companies like "U.S. Robots.." could exist at such economical conditions.
I believe, these are things that we can notice only from current point of development of the world, technology and AI systems and it was impossible for Isaac Asimov to foresee all that at 1950.
But anyway, it's fun reading and author touches upon lots of important issues about development of AI, robotics ethics etc.
I rate it 4 stars from 5. ( )
1 vote AsimGasimzade | Apr 4, 2024 |
Leído y releído muchas veces. ( )
  franhuer | Feb 1, 2024 |
A good classic Sci-fi that holds up over time. It has been decades since I read the Foundation series. Asimov is still a master. ( )
  wvlibrarydude | Jan 14, 2024 |
Interesting book: The plot sucks outright, but the prose and stories are quite good. Essentially, the book is a collection of short stories, most of which are sequential, but all of which are strung together by an interview. Then it ends.
So, no, I will not be reading the rest of the series. Note: I did read the final book "Robots of Dawn" because I found it in the house. It was much worse. ( )
  MXMLLN | Jan 12, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 245 (next | show all)
‘I, Robot’ Is a science fiction history book written by famous author Isaac Asimov, which contains a collection of interconnected stories.It has nine stories except the first story, other stories are interconnected, and these stories explore the relationship between humans and robots in a future society.They story starts with author is encouraging Doctor Susan Calvin, a robopsychologist who works at US Robots and Mechanical Men Corporation, who’s retirement day is that day, to tell stories of robots she encountered in her life.The first story was ‘Robbie’, where a young girl is being too much attached to her nursemaid robot Robbie.But to make her social human being, her parents removed the robot from her.This story goes on where Gloria was saved by Robbie.The next story is ‘Run around’,which is about a robot is facing contradiction of his three law and showing unexpected behaviour. The next story is about a robot Cutie who is not recognizing as human his master.Another story, Liar, Where a robot Harbie can read uman thoughts.But as his power grows stronger, it begans manipulating humans. So the whole book is a manifestation of human robot relationships, a society where we are being threatened by unexpected behavioural changes of robots and pushes readers to think of a world where humans are coexisting with Robots.
added by SyedIstiukRaja | editmy own view, Raja
 

» Add other authors (48 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Asimov, Isaacprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Černý, OldřichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Östlund, HarryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Berkey, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartier, EddCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Efremov, Ivan AntonovičForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elmgren, SvenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fickling, DavidAdaptationsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giphart, RonaldAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hood, AlunCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Regn, JohannesCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, DennisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schrag, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Serra, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vámosi, PálTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wells, AlexIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Daniel H.Prefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelders, Leo H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
THE THREE LAWS OF ROBOTICS

1—A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction allow a human being to come to harm.
2—A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3—A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.


HANDBOOK of ROBOTICS,
56th Edition, 2058 A.D.
Dedication
TO JOHN W. CAMPBELL, JR.,
who godfathered the robots
First words
I looked at my notes and I didn't like them.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (3)

The three laws of Robotics: 1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm 2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law. With these three, simple directives, Isaac Asimov changed our perception of robots forever when he formulated the laws governing their behavior. In I, Robot, Asimov chronicles the development of the robot through a series of interlinked stories: from its primitive origins in the present to its ultimate perfection in the not-so-distant future--a future in which humanity itself may be rendered obsolete. Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world--all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asmiov's trademark.

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Book description
A collection of nine loosely-connected short stories about a future in which semi-sentient robots and humans co-exist, bound together by Asimov's "Three Laws of Robotics."

Robbie ("Strange Playfellow", Super Science Stories, 1940)

Runaround (Astounding SF, 1942)

Reason (Astounding SF, 1941)

Catch That Rabbit (Astounding SF, 1944)

Liar! (Astounding SF, 1941)

Little Lost Robot (Astounding SF, 1947)

Escape! (Astounding SF, 1945)

Evidence (Astounding SF, 1946)

The Evitable Conflict (Astounding SF, 1950)
Haiku summary
Robots must obey
Except when they don't have to
Which seems is always.
(johnxlibris)

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