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Philosophy: An Introduction to the Art of…
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Philosophy: An Introduction to the Art of Wondering (6th ed.) (edition 1994)

by James L. Christian

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1461137,470 (4.5)None
This popular introductory text provides a unique diversity of teaching tools for instructors who prefer a synoptic approach. The text is visually appealing and reader friendly. The author accents his accessible writing with cartoons, quotations, and related findings from the social and physical sciences, reinforcing his emphasis on philosophy as the individual's attempt to unify disparate world views. The level of writing makes all philosophical concepts accessible to students. The emphasis is on synoptic thinking and providing the "big picture," including analytical skills. The biographies give the student a feeling for the great thinkers who have fashioned the Western philosophic tradition and have determined largely how we think today.… (more)

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One of the only college textbooks that I've actually kept. This book covers the very bare bones basics of Philosophy, but also includes thought provoking open-ended questions for the reader. The best thing about this book are the marginal quotations on every page. The quotes reference everyone from Rousseau to Mr. Spock, proving that Philosophy is not some dusty old study of snooty academics, but a relevant way of thinking in our own time. Christian's book leaves many questions unanswered, but gets the reader to think outside the box. I suggest this book to everyone, and am constantly surprised that more people haven't read it. ( )
1 vote KeanLibraryGuy | Oct 14, 2009 |
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This popular introductory text provides a unique diversity of teaching tools for instructors who prefer a synoptic approach. The text is visually appealing and reader friendly. The author accents his accessible writing with cartoons, quotations, and related findings from the social and physical sciences, reinforcing his emphasis on philosophy as the individual's attempt to unify disparate world views. The level of writing makes all philosophical concepts accessible to students. The emphasis is on synoptic thinking and providing the "big picture," including analytical skills. The biographies give the student a feeling for the great thinkers who have fashioned the Western philosophic tradition and have determined largely how we think today.

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