HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Six Degrees: The New Science of Networks by…
Loading...

Six Degrees: The New Science of Networks (original 2003; edition 2004)

by Duncan J. Watts

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7111121,126 (3.77)5
The pioneering young scientist whose work on the structure of small worlds has triggered an avalanche of interest in networks. In this remarkable book, Duncan Watts, one of the principal architects of network theory, sets out to explain the innovative research that he and other scientists are spearheading to create a blueprint of our connected planet. Whether they bind computers, economies, or terrorist organizations, networks are everywhere in the real world, yet only recently have scientists attempted to explain their mysterious workings. From epidemics of disease to outbreaks of market madness, from people searching for information to firms surviving crisis and change, from the structure of personal relationships to the technological and social choices of entire societies, Watts weaves together a network of discoveries across an array of disciplines to tell the story of an explosive new field of knowledge, the people who are building it, and his own peculiar path in forging this new science.… (more)
Member:Jewsbury
Title:Six Degrees: The New Science of Networks
Authors:Duncan J. Watts
Info:Vintage (2004), Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age by Duncan J. Watts (2003)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
4 ( )
  ronchan | Nov 14, 2016 |
This book is a very good introduction to the fascinating world of networked systems - from social groups to computer networks. Why does success breed success in some systems? What does it look like in measurable terms? How do people find information in a social network? I found this book fascinating and I appreciated that it never oversimplified what is a complex topic. I never got Malcolm Gladwelled.
  harrda | Feb 13, 2012 |
A look at the maths behind the idea that there are 'six degreees of separation' and other networking theories. Interesting stuff and I like the fact that the author is not afraid to include plenty of graphs to illustrate his ideas, popular science books that insist on using only words drive me nuts. ( )
  nocto | Dec 13, 2010 |
A look at the maths behind the idea that there are 'six degreees of separation' and other networking theories. Interesting stuff and I like the fact that the author is not afraid to include plenty of graphs to illustrate his ideas, popular science books that insist on using only words drive me nuts. ( )
  nocto | Dec 13, 2010 |
Aleks Krotoski, broadcaster, journalist, and academic specialising in technology and interactivity, has chosen to discuss Duncan J Watts’s Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age on FiveBooks as one of the top five on her subject - Virtual Living, saying that: 



"...Watts has been looking at the small world phenomenon to identify whether the web itself has shrunk our world, and in fact it hasn’t… We still do have those six degrees of separation, even by e-mail, with somebody who’s in, say, Brazil. When it comes down to it, ultimately we do still have the same number of friends and the same number of connections between two points in the world..."


The full interview is available here: http://five-books.com/interviews/aleks-krotoski ( )
  FiveBooks | Mar 17, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
I would recommend Watts's book to Technology and Culture readers seeking an introduction to this new field for themselves or for their students.
added by Katya0133 | editTechnology & Culture, Greg Downey
 
Watts's technical descriptions are solid and clear, but the personal narrative feels forced and is generally superfluous.
added by Katya0133 | editNew Scientist, David Cohen
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.77)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 28
3.5 3
4 30
4.5 2
5 19

W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 142,343,471 books! | Top bar: Always visible