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The Second Scientific American Book of Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions (1961)

by Martin Gardner

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452455,411 (3.95)1
In this second volume in the series, Martin Gardner introduces readers to the generalized ham sandwich theorem, origami, digital roots, magic squares, the mathematics of cooling coffee, the induction game of eleusis, Dudeney puzzles, the maze at Hampton Court Palace, and many more mathematical puzzles and principles.… (more)
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Dated, but I enjoyed thinking about the puzzles as I read them. Each chapter was originally published as a column in a magazine, and the author added a few paragraphs describing the responses he received, as well as the answers to the puzzles. ( )
  Pferdina | Apr 18, 2022 |
More topography, but also more fun diversions. The chapters came from columns he wrote in the late 1950s and it's funny what a generation later turned out: back then, the only other popular die than the standard six-sided cube was an octohedron (he was talking about Platonic solids). The 1970s introduced the world to Dungeons and Dragons and the eventual standardization of D20 games. Dice packs still come in the five Platonic solids. I remember playing Bridge-it a lot at a friend's house and loving it. ( )
  Razinha | May 23, 2017 |
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For J. H. G. who likes to tackle puzzles big enough to walk upon
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Since the appearance of the first Scientific American Book of Mathematical Puzzles & Diversions, in 1959, popular interest in recreational mathematics has continued to increase.
A regular polygon is a plane figure bounded by straight lines, with equal sides and equal interior angles.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The 2nd Scientific American Book of Mathematical Puzzles & Diversions (1961) was republished as Origami, Eleusis, and the Soma Cube (2008, in the series "The New Martin Gardner Mathematical Library").
It was published in the UK as More Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions from Scientific American (hardback: 1963) and More Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions (paperback: 1966)
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In this second volume in the series, Martin Gardner introduces readers to the generalized ham sandwich theorem, origami, digital roots, magic squares, the mathematics of cooling coffee, the induction game of eleusis, Dudeney puzzles, the maze at Hampton Court Palace, and many more mathematical puzzles and principles.

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