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Mother and Daughter Tales (Abbeville Anthology)

by Josephine Evetts-Secker

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542390,250 (4.33)None
Part of the Abbeville Anthology series, this pedestrian retelling of 10 folktales from around the world, all about mothers and daughters, is given a critical boost by Cann's luxuriant illustrations. Evetts-Secker's foreword and endnotes founder with the weight of jargon and specious pronouncements: "The godmother is not an actual goddess, but carries similar energy, compensating for the spiritual poverty of the girl's birth mother," or "[the stories] reflect what it is to be a natural and spiritual woman." Including familiar stories from European traditions as well as less well-known Chinese, Iroquois and Turkish tales, the retellings often rely on cliches. In the space of a few sentences, for example, the author describes how nymphs "fled in fright," as Demeter, whose heart is "froze[n] with fear," is also "frantic with fear." Cann's delicate watercolors include an inviting montage of motifs from various cultures. Surrounding each tale are intricate borders that feature, variously, red Chinese dragons, pale Japanese apple blossoms or vivid Eastern European embroidery patterns. While her figures occasionally look stiff or awkward, Cann's strong and inventive designs seem to burst from each page. Ages 6-12. A collection of folktales from various cultures illuminate the mother-daughter relationship. colour illustrations throughout… (more)
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This book explores the special bond between mothers and daughters in folktales from many world cultures , Greek, Chinese, German, Russian, Japanese, Norwegian , Turkish, Jewish & Slavic ( )
  varshabanerjee | Jan 21, 2018 |
I enjoyed this book for several reasons. The main message of the book was to provide the reader with a variety of family-themed folk tales from around the world. I really liked that the book was a collection of stories from around the world. This way, the reader could read folk tales from a variety of cultures and compare and contrast the stories. I enjoyed that the stories all had the same theme of family, particularly mother daughter relationships, but presented them in different ways. I liked that underneath each folk tale title the nationality of the story was listed which gave the reader some background knowledge on the culture. I also enjoyed that the illustrations corresponded with each story and the culture of that story. I like that the colors used in the stories also change according to the story. For example, the Native American folk tale features more browns, reds and blues while the Japanese folk tale featured pale reds and pinks and yellows. This helps set the mood of each story and gives the reader a visual image of that culture. The language would be appropriate for upper elementary readers. For example, the stories use words and phrases such as “sorrowful” and “feeble”. Younger children might need to use context clues to determine what some of these words mean. ( )
  ygurova | Feb 27, 2016 |
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Part of the Abbeville Anthology series, this pedestrian retelling of 10 folktales from around the world, all about mothers and daughters, is given a critical boost by Cann's luxuriant illustrations. Evetts-Secker's foreword and endnotes founder with the weight of jargon and specious pronouncements: "The godmother is not an actual goddess, but carries similar energy, compensating for the spiritual poverty of the girl's birth mother," or "[the stories] reflect what it is to be a natural and spiritual woman." Including familiar stories from European traditions as well as less well-known Chinese, Iroquois and Turkish tales, the retellings often rely on cliches. In the space of a few sentences, for example, the author describes how nymphs "fled in fright," as Demeter, whose heart is "froze[n] with fear," is also "frantic with fear." Cann's delicate watercolors include an inviting montage of motifs from various cultures. Surrounding each tale are intricate borders that feature, variously, red Chinese dragons, pale Japanese apple blossoms or vivid Eastern European embroidery patterns. While her figures occasionally look stiff or awkward, Cann's strong and inventive designs seem to burst from each page. Ages 6-12. A collection of folktales from various cultures illuminate the mother-daughter relationship. colour illustrations throughout

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