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The Knife of Never Letting Go (2008)

by Patrick Ness

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Chaos Walking (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
4,9313501,530 (4.02)1 / 433
Pursued by power-hungry Prentiss and mad minister Aaron, young Todd and Viola set out across New World searching for answers about his colony's true past and seeking a way to warn the ship bringing hopeful settlers from Old World.
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English (342)  French (3)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (349)
Showing 1-5 of 342 (next | show all)
spoilers ahead

This was a very excellent book, that said I was not happy with the ending. And WHY, WHY do they always kill the dog?! Like you somehow just can't have a coming of age story where the pet dies horribly?

I may have to read the rest of the series, but I'll wait until I feel like being depressed. ( )
  Tip44 | Jun 30, 2020 |
This book I read in almost one go. I kept on reading and reading and reading. I found the whole concept so interesting and intriguing, to be able to hear every single thought of everything. And of course I loved, loved, loved the opening lines of the book:

“The first thing you find out when yer dog learns to talk is that dogs don't got nothing much to say.
About anything.
"Need a poo, Todd."
"Shutup, Manchee."
"Poo. Poo, Todd."
"I said shut it.”

I cried loud, hard and intense, for days when Manchee died. I've never cried as much while reading a book as I did with this book.

The way everything was written down, was perfect, in my eyes. I can't fault this book, I simply can't. ( )
  prettygoodyear | Jun 29, 2020 |
This was surprisingly good and easy novel to get into with a decent SF premise of settlers on an alien world and a genetic plague that reads like any number of YA dystopias, but what makes this one stand apart from all the rest is the twist on psi mind-reading and the Purpose behind the main action.

No spoilers, but there was enough delayed satisfaction going on throughout the novel to keep any jaded reader turning the page. :)

Did I like the characters? Yeah, for the most part, but Todd reads pretty everyman and his emotions are only somewhat convincing. At one point near the end, I just wanted him to do what the other man was telling him to do. What's the fuss? What's the fuss? *sigh*

Still, it was an amusing romp and even if the main plot relied a little too much on the mystery of the plot, the action sequences more than made up for it. I don't think I'll have any issues picking up the next books in the trilogy and enjoying them. I actually want to see what happens next! :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
For a book that seems to argue the benefit of hope, it goes out of its way time and time again to drag its characters through the mud. It's a quick read, and the writing overall is decent, but the story was a bit too heavy too often to sustain my hope for the characters or their end. Yet, this can be chalked up to my own set of expectations. Those who enjoy the turmoil could easily contest this perspective and happily read on. ( )
  peterbmacd | May 17, 2020 |
I tried. I was completely deceived by the high praise for this book. It was not what I thought it would be. The main character was Your Generic Male stand-in which were all supposed to relate to or something. There were no stand out qualities about him. In fact, most the characters were like this and even the dog was like a dumb and excitable version. The metaphor of the noise was obvious and boring. I could only get through the first few chapters and I was tired of it. I read the spoilers for the rest and was unimpressed. ( )
  locriian | May 4, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 342 (next | show all)
added by lucyknows | editSCIS (pay site)
 

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Patrick Nessprimary authorall editionscalculated
Podehl, NickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Folio SF (492)
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Epigraph
If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel's heart beat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence.
George Eliot, Middlemarch
Dedication
For Michelle Kass
First words
The first thing you find out when yer dog learns to talk is that dogs don't got nothing much to say.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Haiku summary
Silence in the noise,
questing and learning to trust,
dangerous New World.
(leahdawn)
Todd Hewitt is the
last boy in Prentisstown. What
will make him a man?
(passion4reading)

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Candlewick Press

2 editions of this book were published by Candlewick Press.

Editions: 0763639311, 0763645761

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