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Ender in Exile

by Orson Scott Card

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Ender's Game (1.5), Ender Saga (5), Enderverse (13 (short stories 8.3, 8.4, 9.1, 9.2))

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3,563683,595 (3.67)74
At the close of Ender's Game, Andrew Wiggin, called Ender by everyone, is told that he can no longer live on Earth, and he realizes that this is the truth. He has become far more than just a boy who won a game: he is the Savior of Earth, a hero, a military genius whose allegiance is sought by every nation of the newly shattered Earth Hegemony. He is offered the choice of living in isolation on Eros, at one of the Hegemony's training facilities, but instead the twelve-year-old chooses to leave his home world and begin the long relativistic journey out to the colonies. With him went his sister Valentine, and the core of the artificial intelligence that would become Jane. The story of those years has never been told, until now.… (more)
  1. 51
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (Karlstar)
    Karlstar: Ender's Game is one of the best science fiction novels ever! Most people read the 2 novel version, which includes 'Speaker for the Dead'. Highly recommended!
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» See also 74 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
(3.85 Stars)

I forgot how much I loved this series!

OSC is a great writer, and this is such an interesting story. This book fills in a gap between other major works and really grows Ender/Andrew as a character.

I don't know if I just never noticed it in other books or if OSC has inserted his religious beliefs in this book more than his others (keep in mind it has been several years since I last read an OSC book). It isn't to the point where I feel like it is being shoved down my throat, but it is there, and unnecessarily so... in most cases.
( )
  philibin | Mar 25, 2024 |
Set immediately after the events of Ender's Game, this sequel narrates Ender's life following the end of the Bugger War. The story deals primarily with the guilt that Ender feels as a result of having killed two boys while at Battle School, and the unknowing xenocide of an entire species.

Ender sacrifices his reputation by revealing the deaths of Bonzo and Stilson to the court martial, even though he is unable to understand why the buggers "let him win." He travels out into the colonies to find an answer, and eventually lets himself be beaten up, partly to punish himself.


Orson Scott Card provides some further great lore on the wars during Peter's ascent to the Hegemony. I enjoyed the following up of many characters from Ender's Game, as well as the power the jeesh had on the new Earth. Insight into the way the colonies were created was also welcome.

I think this book falls down on the necessity of sticking with the previous timeline at the end of Ender's Game. Card's afterword notes that he is prone to making errors in continuity. The book suffers from spending a lot of time dealing with how Ender sees his parents and sister on his way to Shakespeare, and much less with his own redemption until the very end. Various plotlines on the ship appeared gratuitous to me - enjoyable to read, but not apparently necessary and diminishing from the "point" of the book.

Looking forward to exploring more of Ender's universe. ( )
  Zedseayou | Jan 30, 2024 |
Looks like I accidentally read this after Shadows in Flight, though not too sure whether a made a distinct difference. Anyway, I generally enjoyed the book, but like Ender's Game the ending sucks outright. ( )
  MXMLLN | Jan 12, 2024 |
Filler. That's my overall opinion of this book. It was easy to read and kept moving, but ultimately it didn't get anywhere. If this were a television series, this would be one of the episodes that you made sure to watch, in order to remain up-to-date on the universe, but then promptly forgot because it was so mundane. I expected at least a surprise or two, but that didn't happen. In the midst of it, I enjoyed Ender's ability to think ten moves ahead of almost everyone. In the end, I have to say that I don't really buy a 15-year-old's ability to understand human nature that well, no matter what kind of genius he's supposed to be. Semi-recommended only for Ender completists. ( )
  zot79 | Aug 20, 2023 |
I'm sure the other reviews cover the basic story well enough that I don't need to add my comments. What stuck with me most from the book is why the buggers thought it was OK to take over human planets: We couldn't be an intelligent species worth preserving because we did not communicate as they did---telepathically. I'm reminded of a quote from God's Secretaries about the Native Americans lacking any culture because they had no writing. ( )
  raizel | Jun 27, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 65 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Card, Orson Scottprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barceló, MiquelPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Birney, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bury, FlorenceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Card, Emily JaniceNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
De Cuir, GabrielleNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibbons, LeeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harris, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heyborne, KirbyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rudnicki, StefanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Baydon Hilton, Jordan Hilton, Ricky Fenton

Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio:
you continue to earn my trust and admiration as fellow travelers on the twisted path of life.
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You understand that during the recent attempt by the Warsaw Pact to take over the International Fleet, our sole concern at EducAdmin was the safety of the children.
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Wikipedia in English (2)

At the close of Ender's Game, Andrew Wiggin, called Ender by everyone, is told that he can no longer live on Earth, and he realizes that this is the truth. He has become far more than just a boy who won a game: he is the Savior of Earth, a hero, a military genius whose allegiance is sought by every nation of the newly shattered Earth Hegemony. He is offered the choice of living in isolation on Eros, at one of the Hegemony's training facilities, but instead the twelve-year-old chooses to leave his home world and begin the long relativistic journey out to the colonies. With him went his sister Valentine, and the core of the artificial intelligence that would become Jane. The story of those years has never been told, until now.

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Haiku summary
Ender saves the world,
Then rides on a fast space ship
Looking for buggers.

(legallypuzzled)

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Average: (3.67)
0.5
1 12
1.5 1
2 44
2.5 15
3 187
3.5 45
4 243
4.5 23
5 117

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