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The Tempest: The Oxford Shakespeare: The…
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The Tempest: The Oxford Shakespeare: The Oxford Shakespeare the Tempest… (original 1610; edition 2008)

by William Shakespeare (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
12,253169436 (3.93)3 / 548
"Shakespeare's valedictory play is also one of his most poetical and magical. The story involves the spirit Ariel, the savage Caliban, and Prospero, the banished Duke of Milan, now a wizard living on a remote island who uses his magic to shipwreck a party of ex-compatriots. This extensively annotated version of The Tempest makes the play completely accessible to readers in the twenty-first century." "Linguist and translator Burton Raffel offers generous help with vocabulary, pronunciation, and prosody and provides alternative readings of phrases and lines. His on-page annotations give readers all the tools they need to comprehend the play and begin to explore its many possible interpretations. Raffel provides an introductory essay, and in a concluding essay, Harold Bloom examines the characters Prospero and Caliban."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)
Member:Ranall
Title:The Tempest: The Oxford Shakespeare: The Oxford Shakespeare the Tempest (Oxford World's Classics)
Authors:William Shakespeare (Author)
Info:OUP Oxford (2008), Edition: Reprint, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

The Tempest by William Shakespeare (1610)

  1. 30
    Forbidden Planet: A Novel by W. J. Stuart (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: The Tempest in outer space.
  2. 20
    Ariel by Grace Tiffany (gabeblaze)
    gabeblaze: Ariel is the story of the tempest from the knavish sprite Ariel's point of view, the story is basically the same as the classic The Tempest, with some exceptions.
  3. 31
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (Sylak)
    Sylak: Caliban in The Tempest has many parallels with John the Savage in Brave New World.
  4. 10
    The Tempest, Symphonic Fantasia in F minor by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Waldstein)
    Waldstein: A musical spin-off worth reading/hearing. If you can, read the score. If you can't, check any of the available recordings (Abbado, Fistoulari, Pletnev, Jarvi, Litton, Stokowski, Toscanini).
  5. 10
    Mama Day by Gloria Naylor (susanbooks)
  6. 10
    The Collector by John Fowles (Booksloth)
  7. 00
    Prospero's Daughter by Elizabeth Nunez (susanbooks)
  8. 00
    The Sea and the Mirror by W. H. Auden (Waldstein)
    Waldstein: A literary spin-off that surpasses the original. A rare case indeed! What Will started 400 years ago, Wystan finished in the last century: he turned the cardboard stereotypes into real characters.
  9. 01
    An Unofficial Rose by Iris Murdoch (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: In der Einleitung zu "an unofficial rose" von Iris Murdoch schreibt Anthony D. Nuttal: "But this book is really much more Shakespearen than it is Dickensian, The Tempest, which will figure so prominently in The Sea, The Sea, is powerfully though less obtrusively operative in this earlier book."… (more)
  10. 01
    The Dream of Perpetual Motion by Dexter Palmer (sturlington)
    sturlington: The Dream of Perpetual Motion is a steampunk retelling of The Tempest
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English (158)  Italian (2)  Spanish (2)  Portuguese (Brazil) (2)  Swedish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (166)
Showing 1-5 of 158 (next | show all)
No.
I don't know if I stopped liking Shakespeare or if this is just plain bad, but I refuse to continue. It's sexist, boring and I don't want to.
The reason I picked this up is because I am interested in two books that are inspired by this play so I wanted to give the original a try. I will look up a summary or something that doesn't waste my time instead.
Maybe I don't enjoy reading plays anymore.
  elderlingfae | Aug 11, 2022 |
Perhaps the best of Shakespeare's comedies, The Tempest is a tale of fury, retribution, forgiveness and the laying down of power. Prospero, the legitimate Duke of Milan is stranded on an island with only his daughter and the original inhabitants, Caliban and the spirits. He is here because of the treachery of his brother, Antonio, who with the help of Alonzo, the King of Naples, has deprived him of his kingdom and his title. Who could blame Prospero for stirring up a tempest to entrap and confine his enemies, the King of Naples and Antonio when they come within his grasp?

Prospero has the power to destroy his enemies and take his revenge. It is what he does with that power that makes this play extraordinary and meaningful. A tale that begins as a tale of revenge becomes a tale of forgiveness. A tale that begins with a man of unparalleled power, ends with a man willing to lay that power aside, even in the presence of men who have already betrayed him once. Along the way, there is laughter and intrigue and a bit of a romance, which are all dealt with in Shakespeare's inimitably witty and poetic style.

graves at my command
Have waked their sleepers, oped, and let 'em forth
By my so potent art. But this rough magic
I here abjure, and, when I have required
Some heavenly music, which even now I do,
To work mine end upon their senses that
This airy charm is for, I'll break my staff,
Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,
And deeper than did ever plummet sound
I'll drown my book. [solemn music.]


Solemn music indeed to accompany this poetic dirge. How few men of power have we ever seen lay it aside? At the end, Ariel is set free for services well rendered, and Prospero seems the wisest of men who has used his power to build rather than to destroy.

So many others have already done a much finer job of reviewing this play, so I will make no further attempt to dissect or praise it. I can only say that there is a reason all the great writers of every century since his time have read Shakespeare, quoted him, lauded him and attempted to channel him; and that reason is infinitely clear when you read this play. ( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
I’m not even a little scholarly so this was read and reviewed from purely an entertainment standpoint.

While I like a bit of magic, the way it’s done here is the sort I struggle with, I like rules, I like parameters on magic/powers rather than feeling like the author or in this case the playwright can use it at any time to take the easy way out of any corner they’ve written the story into, I guess to me it makes the narrative feel somewhat manipulated rather than fully earned. Plus I mean if there are no limits to what Prospero can do with the magic and spirits or whatever else at his disposal then how did he even end up shipwrecked and why didn’t he leave the island eons ago and reclaim his position of power?

I wish there had been more to the insta-romance as given the animosity between the families there was more to explore in the dynamics of this relationship.

Where this worked best for me was in the scheming and conniving, those moments held my interest even if ultimately all of it seemed to resolve just a little too easily. ( )
  SJGirl | May 30, 2022 |
The first time through I felt as if nothing much happened in this play, but on a re-read, I like it better. I think I need to watch a performance or two for the full effect. ( )
  pgchuis | Apr 25, 2022 |
"We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep."
  roseandisabella | Mar 18, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 158 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (327 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shakespeare, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Andrews, John F.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Arnold, AnnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Barton, AnneEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Black, Ebenezer CharltonEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blatchford, RoyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boas, Frederick S.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butler, MartinEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Deighton, K.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dulac, EdmundIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gentleman, DavidCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gollancz, IsraelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, George B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hodges, C. WalterCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holland, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hudson, Henry N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kastan, David ScottIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kermode, FrankEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kittredge, George LymanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Komrij, GerritTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindley, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lodovici, Cesare VicoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mowat, Barbara A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Orgel, StephenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Proudfoot, RichardGeneral editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quiller-Couch, Arthur ThomasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stevenson, O. J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thompson, AnnGeneral editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tiesema, WatzeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tiffany, GraceEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vaughan, Alden T.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vaughan, Virginia MasonEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verity, A. W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werstine, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wood, StanleyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Boatswain!
Quotations
I would fain die a dry death.
Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.
Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Knowing I lov'd my books, he furnish'd me
From mine own library with volumes that
I prize above my dukedom.
The fringed curtains of thine eye advance.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work is for the complete The Tempest only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or simplifications (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
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"Shakespeare's valedictory play is also one of his most poetical and magical. The story involves the spirit Ariel, the savage Caliban, and Prospero, the banished Duke of Milan, now a wizard living on a remote island who uses his magic to shipwreck a party of ex-compatriots. This extensively annotated version of The Tempest makes the play completely accessible to readers in the twenty-first century." "Linguist and translator Burton Raffel offers generous help with vocabulary, pronunciation, and prosody and provides alternative readings of phrases and lines. His on-page annotations give readers all the tools they need to comprehend the play and begin to explore its many possible interpretations. Raffel provides an introductory essay, and in a concluding essay, Harold Bloom examines the characters Prospero and Caliban."--BOOK JACKET.

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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0451527127, 0140714855, 0141016647

Ediciones Encuentro

An edition of this book was published by Ediciones Encuentro.

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