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A Discourse on the Method (Oxford World's…
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A Discourse on the Method (Oxford World's Classics) (original 1637; edition 2006)

by René Descartes (Author)

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2,227325,409 (3.57)11
'I concluded that I was a substance whose whole essence or nature resides only in thinking, and which, in order to exist, has no need of place and is not dependent on any material thing.'Descartes's A Discourse on the Method of Correctly Conducting One's Reason and Seeking Truth in the Sciences marks a watershed in European thought; in it, the author provides an informal intellectual autobiography in the vernacular for a non-specialist readership, sweeps away all previousphilosophical traditions, and sets out in brief his radical new philosophy, which begins with a proof of the existence of the self (the famous 'cogito ergo sum'), next deduces from it the existence and nature of God, and ends by offering a radical new account of the physical world and of human andanimal nature.This new translation is accompanied by a substantial introductory essay which draws on Descartes's correspondence to examine his motivation and the impact of his great work on his contemporaries. Detailed notes explain his philosophical terminology and ideas.… (more)
Member:BradenBarber
Title:A Discourse on the Method (Oxford World's Classics)
Authors:René Descartes (Author)
Info:Oxford University Press (2006), 160 pages
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Discourse on Method by René Descartes (1637)

  1. 00
    The Ethics by Benedict de Spinoza (caflores)
    caflores: Descartes es más claro y breve, pero Spinoza lleva la racionalidad más lejos.
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» See also 11 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Philosophy
  hpryor | Aug 8, 2021 |
Adquirido em 2018 no Andorinha
  Nagib | May 25, 2020 |
Absolutely fundamental to understand Descartes philosophy ( )
  Aimapotis | Jan 3, 2017 |
Like a warm bath for the mind, and takes about as long - parts 1-4 at least. Reading it in English, I wonder if he is so straightforward and readable in French. Parts 1-4 are eloquent and minimal, and certainly worth re-reading - meditations of reason. Part 5, home to the famous 'cogito ergo sum' line, is pretty tedious after the first page and that very quote. Just skip part 6. The introduction - despite being longer than the actual text - is worth reading. It sets the scene and gives the historical context. Interesting to note that it was originally published in French, so perhaps the line we know him by should rather be 'je pense donc je suis'. If it had ended on that line, I would rate it 5. ( )
  jculkin | Feb 1, 2016 |
""
  rouzejp | Sep 2, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (80 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Descartes, Renéprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Frondizi, RisieriEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heffernan, GeorgeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lafleur, Laurence J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maclean, IanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Renault, LaurenceIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robinet, AndréIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zariņš, VilnisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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'I concluded that I was a substance whose whole essence or nature resides only in thinking, and which, in order to exist, has no need of place and is not dependent on any material thing.'Descartes's A Discourse on the Method of Correctly Conducting One's Reason and Seeking Truth in the Sciences marks a watershed in European thought; in it, the author provides an informal intellectual autobiography in the vernacular for a non-specialist readership, sweeps away all previousphilosophical traditions, and sets out in brief his radical new philosophy, which begins with a proof of the existence of the self (the famous 'cogito ergo sum'), next deduces from it the existence and nature of God, and ends by offering a radical new account of the physical world and of human andanimal nature.This new translation is accompanied by a substantial introductory essay which draws on Descartes's correspondence to examine his motivation and the impact of his great work on his contemporaries. Detailed notes explain his philosophical terminology and ideas.

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