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38 Latin Stories Designed to Accompany Frederic M. Wheelock's Latin (1989)

by Anne H. Groton

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824519,025 (3.75)3
Originally designed as a supplement to the Latin course by F. M. Wheelock, this book is well suited for use in any introductory or review course. All the stories in the book are based on actual Latin literature, with the stories simplified at first and made gradually more complex as the work progresses. Students will learn how classical Latin was really written as they become familiar with the works of the great Latin authors.… (more)
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Showing 5 of 5
This is a book for a specific purpose. Outside of that purpose, it's abysmal. This is not a book of "Latin stories" or in any way of use to self-learners. This is really an exercise book for the specific context of first-year Latin students reinforcing concepts through somewhat paraphrased creations in the language.

As a classroom aid, though, it's satisfactory. One of the challenges with learning first-year Latin is that, of course, most surviving texts from Ancient Rome are too complex for you. Most people don't write stories that only use five grammatical concepts, for instance, which can be easily plucked out of history for a student in their fifth week of learning the language! These stories help to bulk up this early period of a student's learning, with teacher guidance. ( )
  therebelprince | Apr 27, 2020 |
A good supplement to Wheelock, with just the right amount of help given to support you as you work your way through the Latin translations. The bowdlerised stories are not terribly exciting—though I suppose when is learning a language via a text book ever fun? ( )
  siriaeve | Feb 19, 2010 |
This is a great supplement to Wheelock's Latin and for beginning Latin student's in general. I teach a short 2 hour beginning Latin seminar at festivals and people are able to work in groups and translate the first short story by the end of the class. It is great for their confidence! They are actually reading Latin!

The stories are more fun than those in the textbook and also relate the mythology of the culture. Especially useful when teaching young people, I think this is an excellent resource! ( )
2 vote Phoenix333 | Feb 12, 2009 |
Terrific companion to Wheelock, makes your brain work. But not exactly exciting. ( )
  ktonks | Jul 18, 2007 |
this is a great companion to wheelock. the stories are weird and interesting, because of this i was always excited to work through them. ( )
  geeksheartgrammar | Aug 17, 2006 |
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Originally designed as a supplement to the Latin course by F. M. Wheelock, this book is well suited for use in any introductory or review course. All the stories in the book are based on actual Latin literature, with the stories simplified at first and made gradually more complex as the work progresses. Students will learn how classical Latin was really written as they become familiar with the works of the great Latin authors.

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