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Reduction, Explanation, and Realism (Clarendon Paperbacks)

by David Charles (Editor), Kathleen Lennon (Editor)

Other authors: Justin Broackes (Contributor), John Campbell (Contributor), Quassim Cassam (Contributor), Adrian Cussins (Contributor), James Griffin (Contributor)9 more, Jennifer Hornsby (Contributor), Frank Jackson (Contributor), Brian Loar (Contributor), Cynthia Macdonald (Contributor), Graham Macdonald (Contributor), David Papineau (Contributor), Philip Pettit (Contributor), Michael Smith (Contributor), Peter Smith (Contributor)

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What is reduction? Must all discussions of the mind, value, colour, biological organisms, and persons aim to reduce these to objects and properties that can be studied by more basic, physical science? Conversely, does failure to achieve a reduction undermine the legitimacy of higher levels ofdescription or explanation? In recent years philosophers have attempted to avoid these traditional alternatives by developing an account of higher-level phenomena which shows them to be grounded in, but not reducible to, basic physical objects and properties. The contributors to this volume examinethe motivations for such anti-reductionist views, and assess their coherence and success, in a number of different fields. Their essays constitute a unified discussion, into which the reader is led by an introductory chapter where the editors set out some of the central claims and questions.… (more)

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charles, DavidEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lennon, KathleenEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Broackes, JustinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Campbell, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cassam, QuassimContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cussins, AdrianContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Griffin, JamesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hornsby, JenniferContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jackson, FrankContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Loar, BrianContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Macdonald, CynthiaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Macdonald, GrahamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Papineau, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pettit, PhilipContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, PeterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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What is reduction? Must all discussions of the mind, value, colour, biological organisms, and persons aim to reduce these to objects and properties that can be studied by more basic, physical science? Conversely, does failure to achieve a reduction undermine the legitimacy of higher levels ofdescription or explanation? In recent years philosophers have attempted to avoid these traditional alternatives by developing an account of higher-level phenomena which shows them to be grounded in, but not reducible to, basic physical objects and properties. The contributors to this volume examinethe motivations for such anti-reductionist views, and assess their coherence and success, in a number of different fields. Their essays constitute a unified discussion, into which the reader is led by an introductory chapter where the editors set out some of the central claims and questions.

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