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The Egyptian Book of the Dead: The Book of Going Forth by Day

by Raymond O. Faulkner

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
867918,962 (4.08)11
For the first time in 3,300 years,The Egyptian Book of the Dead: The Book of Going Forth by Day: The Papyrus of Ani is showcased in its entirety in seventy-four magnificent color pages. Maybe the most stunning presentation of this book in 3300 years: Upon death, it was the practice for some Egyptians to produce a papyrus manuscript called theBook of Going Forth by Day or theBook of the Dead. ABook of the Dead included declarations and spells to help the deceased in the afterlife. ThePapyrus of Ani is the manuscript compiled for Ani, the royal scribe of Thebes. Written and illustrated almost 3,300 years ago,The Papyrus of Ani is a papyrus manuscript with cursive hieroglyphs and color illustrations.It is the most beautiful, best-preserved, and complete example of ancient Egyptian philosophical and religious thought known to exist. The Egyptian Book of the Dead is an integral part of the world's spiritual heritage. It is an artistic rendering of the mysteries of life and death. For the first time since its creation, this ancient papyrus is now available in full color with an integrated English translation directly below each image.This twentieth-anniversary edition ofThe Egyptian Book of the Dead has been revised and expanded to include: Significant improvements to the display of the images of the Papyrus. A survey of the continuing importance of ancient Egypt in modern culture. A detailed history of Egyptian translation and philology since the discovery of the Rosetta Stone in 1799. And, a state-of-the-art Annotated Bibliography and Study Guide for Ancient Egyptian studies. As the third revised edition, the entire corpus of this critical work is given its most accessible and lavish presentation ever. Includes a detailed history of Egyptian scholarship, an annotated bibliography and study guide, and several improvements to the color plates. Makes an excellent gift for people interested in world history and ancient religions.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
The Egyptian Book of the Dead was written around the beginning of the New Kingdom. This was around 1600 B.C., or before Christ. A crucial part of Egyptian culture was the afterlife. The Egyptians also valued their mythology and gods. The Book of the Dead was essentially a guide to help Egyptians navigate their way to the afterlife. The book contains collections of hymns and spells, or as the book calls them "Chapters". As stated before, the Egyptians were very close to their gods. Due to this, many of the hymns and spells were written in honor of these gods. They were mainly Osiris, Thoth, and Ra.

I believe that the Book of the Dead is very interesting. It's an in depth dive of the Egyptian's true beliefs. The whole concept of an afterlife is intriguing itself, and their are several different takes on it. The Egyptian's take on it is very fascinating. I find it alluring to see these hymns, and to think that their society might've been built around this concept is very thought-provoking. I also find it engaging in the fact that you can find more about the gods. It's great to see how dedicated the Egyptians were to the worship of their deities. Since it was a book about the afterlife, Osiris is a big part in the book. ( )
  JTomasulo.ELA2 | Jan 13, 2020 |
Dense and boring. The pictures were wonderful though. ( )
  benuathanasia | Nov 25, 2012 |
There is no authoritative version of the Book of Going Forth by Day (the more accurate translation of what is best known as the Book of the Dead). This presentation of the most beautiful and lengthy papyrus (the Papyrus of Ani), is lushly illustrated and extensively annotated.The original, illuminated manuscript is presented in full color on each page, with the modern English translation below. A couple of four-page pull-outs present larger sections in great detail, and there are many, many explanatory notes. ( )
1 vote dogrover | Aug 24, 2010 |
It is a shame that it can be so hard to find translations of the Book of Going Forth By Day by anyone other than Budge. I was especially disappointed to find a lack of any such ebooks, although the Budge translation abounds (and I do own a copy on my Kindle, mostly for completeness with my Budge library). However, Budge's translation is known not to be the most accurate translation out there.Enter Faulkner's translation. Gorgeously illustrated with portions of several papyri from the British Museum collection, including examples in both hieroglyphics and hieratics, with an excellent introduction and notes of historical interest in the development of the book from the earliest onset of the cult of Osiris (and before, touching on the Pyramid Texts). The book arranges the spells mostly in order, however, the crucial spell 30B (the judgement of the dead) is listed first, followed by spell 125, a declaration of innocence.For anyone interested in classical history, this book is definitely a welcome addition. ( )
  kislam | Nov 28, 2009 |
It is a shame that it can be so hard to find translations of the Book of Going Forth By Day by anyone other than Budge. I was especially disappointed to find a lack of any such ebooks, although the Budge translation abounds (and I do own a copy on my Kindle, mostly for completeness with my Budge library). However, Budge's translation is known not to be the most accurate translation out there.Enter Faulkner's translation. Gorgeously illustrated with portions of several papyri from the British Museum collection, including examples in both hieroglyphics and hieratics, with an excellent introduction and notes of historical interest in the development of the book from the earliest onset of the cult of Osiris (and before, touching on the Pyramid Texts). The book arranges the spells mostly in order, however, the crucial spell 30B (the judgement of the dead) is listed first, followed by spell 125, a declaration of innocence.For anyone interested in classical history, this book is definitely a welcome addition. ( )
  kislam | Nov 28, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Raymond O. Faulknerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Allen, James P.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Andrews, CarolPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goelet, OgdenIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
von Dassow, EvaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wasserman, JamesProducersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
This book is dedicated to Tahuti (Djehuty)
The Lord of Wisdom and of Utterance
The God who cometh forth from the Veil

And To Bill Corsa
Without whose intelligence and integrity it would have remained a dream
First words
He says: Hail to you, you having come as Khepri, even Khepri who is the creator of the gods.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
There is no single ancient Egyptian work called The Book of the Dead. Instead, there were collections of "spells" (about 200 altogether) written on papyrus and buried with the deceased to help on the journey to the next life.
No single papyrus contains all the spells. Thanks to many reprints, the most common translation available is by E. A. Wallis Budge; published in 1898. Since then, many other funerary papyri have been translated (and it's also be noted that some of Budge's translation was just plain wrong). Subsequent translations by Thomas George Allen (1968) and Raymond Faulkner (1972, sometimes attributed to Carol Andrews, the editor) are much more up-to-date and contain better supplemental material. The different translations should not be combined.
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For the first time in 3,300 years,The Egyptian Book of the Dead: The Book of Going Forth by Day: The Papyrus of Ani is showcased in its entirety in seventy-four magnificent color pages. Maybe the most stunning presentation of this book in 3300 years: Upon death, it was the practice for some Egyptians to produce a papyrus manuscript called theBook of Going Forth by Day or theBook of the Dead. ABook of the Dead included declarations and spells to help the deceased in the afterlife. ThePapyrus of Ani is the manuscript compiled for Ani, the royal scribe of Thebes. Written and illustrated almost 3,300 years ago,The Papyrus of Ani is a papyrus manuscript with cursive hieroglyphs and color illustrations.It is the most beautiful, best-preserved, and complete example of ancient Egyptian philosophical and religious thought known to exist. The Egyptian Book of the Dead is an integral part of the world's spiritual heritage. It is an artistic rendering of the mysteries of life and death. For the first time since its creation, this ancient papyrus is now available in full color with an integrated English translation directly below each image.This twentieth-anniversary edition ofThe Egyptian Book of the Dead has been revised and expanded to include: Significant improvements to the display of the images of the Papyrus. A survey of the continuing importance of ancient Egypt in modern culture. A detailed history of Egyptian translation and philology since the discovery of the Rosetta Stone in 1799. And, a state-of-the-art Annotated Bibliography and Study Guide for Ancient Egyptian studies. As the third revised edition, the entire corpus of this critical work is given its most accessible and lavish presentation ever. Includes a detailed history of Egyptian scholarship, an annotated bibliography and study guide, and several improvements to the color plates. Makes an excellent gift for people interested in world history and ancient religions.

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The Book of the Dead is the name now given to a collection of religious and magical texts meant to secure for the deceased a satisfactory afterlife and five him the power to leave the tomb if necessary. This illustrated volume is translated from the papyrus prepared for the scribe Ani, which is kept in the British Museum.
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