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Where the Lightning Strikes: The Lives of American Indian Sacred Places (2006)

by Peter Nabokov

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981223,562 (3.5)None
Profiles sixteen locations of sacred relevance to Native Americans, explaining how each site reflects the diversity of a unique Native American culture, including the Rainbow Canyon in Arizona and the high country of northwestern California.
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A thousand things could've gone wrong with a book like this, but none of them did. Nabokov's treatment of native spirituality is deeply understanding and sensitive. His telling of the history of these peoples and places –rooted in Western history as they must be in the same way the history of a hole in the ground is inextricably tied to the bulldozer that dug it– is even-handed, as disturbing as an honest assessment of this history can sometimes be for Westerners. A good, quick, thought-provoking read. ( )
  wesh | Jan 7, 2008 |
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For Vine Deloria Jr.
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The sacred places of American Indians may include cliffs spilling with waterfalls, caves splattered with bat excrement, rock bridges arching across pastel canyons and desert sinks rimmed with algae.
(Introduction) My first encounter with the merging of physical and spiritual habitats described in this book came on a hot South Dakota afternoon in 1958.
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Profiles sixteen locations of sacred relevance to Native Americans, explaining how each site reflects the diversity of a unique Native American culture, including the Rainbow Canyon in Arizona and the high country of northwestern California.

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