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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by…
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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying (original 1992; edition 1996)

by Sogyal Rinpoche

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,063235,876 (4.21)9
"A magnificent achievement. In its power to touch the heart, to awaken consciousness, [The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying] is an inestimable gift." --San Francisco Chronicle A newly revised and updated 25th Anniversary edition of the internationally bestselling spiritual classic, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpoche, is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. An enlightening, inspiring, and comforting manual for life and death that the New York Times calls, "The Tibetan equivalent of [Dante's] The Divine Comedy," this is the essential work that moved Huston Smith, author of The World's Religions, to proclaim, "I have encountered no book on the interplay of life and death that is more comprehensive, practical, and wise."… (more)
Member:sueonline
Title:The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying
Authors:Sogyal Rinpoche
Info:Rider & Co (1996), Paperback
Collections:Your library
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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche (1992)

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English (16)  German (2)  Spanish (1)  Finnish (1)  French (1)  All languages (21)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
I think this book has sat on my physical TBR longer than any other book I have owned, somewhere in the region of 10 years. Since then I have tried to read it several times, each time not getting more than 50 pages into it before having to put it aside. I always put it aside due to the fact it is pretty heavy going, this is not a book to read when you are tired or distracted. In recent months my reading has been going great so I decided to pick it up again and this time to finish it. Along the way I also read something lighter to give me some entertainment when I felt a big bogged down.

Looking at reviews of the book online it appears that it does live up the claim on the cover, it is widely regarded as a spiritual classic. My forays online also revealed something that I was unaware of. Sogyal Rinpoche has been implicated is a sexual abuse scandal involving his female disciples. He took advantage of his position of master and as a result has been widely shunned by the Tibetan Buddhist community. This put me in a bit of an awkward situation, I wanted to read the book but felt his actions are very contradictory with regards to his message. I felt I should plow on with the book though and see what it had to offer.

Sadly for me the book was a miss despite it being loved by many people. I have had an interest in Buddhist for most of my adult life but I wouldn't really consider myself a religious person. I am agnostic by nature and one thing I have always admired about Buddhism is the message to make use of what you find value in and let the rest go. Unquestionable belief is not a requirement and I find this comforting. This book contained far too many tales of miracles and mystical woo woo for my liking. The parts about compassion, empathy, and caring for the dying were fantastic but too often they were packaged with unbelievable 'facts'. If i had been a fully signed up Buddhist with a leaning towards the Tibetan traditions I'm sure I would have loved this book.

Large sections of the book are very pressing on the importance of the master-disciple relationship. This was uncomfortable reading as it is easy to see in hindsight how he has used these beliefs take advantage of women by giving them 'special teachings'. For the relationship to work I would imagine there has to be complete trust and as someone who held such a highly respected position to abuse this trust is unforgivable. This is even more troubling when you consider many people went to him for guidance on dealing with death of either themselves or their loved ones. ( )
  Brian. | Jul 28, 2021 |
This book reminded me of why I ditched Buddhism years ago. The condescending tone. The mysticism. The abject renunciation of critical thought. Nope. Back to the Stoics. ( )
  marzagao | Jun 1, 2021 |
A discussion of the age-old techniques on which the classic "Tibetan Book of the Dead" is based examines the possibility for healing that can be released when people begin to view death as another chapter of life.
  cpcs-acts | Sep 23, 2020 |
Very good piece on death, the process of dying and the art of dying. Derived from ancient Tibetan knowledge and wisdom. One important point is that if you are prepared for death and know what to expect, it gives you peace of mind, reduces fear, and makes it easier to live your current life fully. I’ve bought several copies of this book and distributed it amongst the people close to me, with my wish that I want do die as instructed in this book, and that I want to have this book read to me on my death bed. In case you are confronted with death in your close circle, consider reading some passages of this book to the one who is dying, to ease their fear and to prepare them for what is coming. ( )
  remouherek | Feb 24, 2020 |
The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche is a classic of Eastern Philosophy. It discusses the methods and techniques to prepare your mindset for the impending specter of death that eventually visits us all. The book is not all about death and dying, it attempts to instruct the reader on how to live without regret. It is beautifully written and quite inspiring. The version I have is the Twentieth Anniversary edition and other than the preface message, I don’t think anything else was updated.

The book discusses phenomena associated with dying people, some of whom have attained enlightenment. Since I don’t really believe in God or Life after Death, trying to wrap my head around stories of Reincarnation gave me feelings of cognitive dissonance. I mean, I can accept some things, but past lives and Life after Death is not something you can really explain without a hand wave. So some parts of this book were really hard to swallow, but I can accept the advice it provides to take care of dying people. In the end, people are all pretty much the same. When you are dying, the facade that you put forth for others comes off and you become who you truly are.

On another note, the book is also quite informative about Tibetan Culture and how they choose successors and other things. For instance, take the name of the author. Since I am a Westerner and an American, I generally assume that the person’s given name comes first and the family name comes last. Now I know that some other cultures have the opposite way of doing that, notably Japan and maybe Korea. For this gentleman, it isn’t even that. He inherited the name ‘Rinpoche’ as a title which means ‘Precious One.’

So this book was really fascinating and I liked it quite a bit. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sogyal Rinpocheprimary authorall editionscalculated
Tenzin Gyatzo. XIV Dalai LamaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Šią knygą skiriu Džamjangui Kjencė Čiokji Lodro, Dudžomui Rinpočei ir visiems kitiems mylimiems mokytojams, teikusiems mano gyvenimui įkvėpimą. Tebūnie ši knyga Išsilaisvinimo vadovas gyviesiems, mirštantiesiems ir mirusiesiems. Tepadeda ji visiems skaitytojams ir teskatina juos keliauti į nušvitimą!
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basierend auf "2002 (amerikanische Originalausgabe). Revised and updated version."
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"A magnificent achievement. In its power to touch the heart, to awaken consciousness, [The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying] is an inestimable gift." --San Francisco Chronicle A newly revised and updated 25th Anniversary edition of the internationally bestselling spiritual classic, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpoche, is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. An enlightening, inspiring, and comforting manual for life and death that the New York Times calls, "The Tibetan equivalent of [Dante's] The Divine Comedy," this is the essential work that moved Huston Smith, author of The World's Religions, to proclaim, "I have encountered no book on the interplay of life and death that is more comprehensive, practical, and wise."

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