HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Silver Spire (1992)

by Robert Goldsborough

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Goldsborough's Nero Wolfe (6), Nero Wolfe (50.6)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2074131,773 (3.48)5
When a fellow shamus gets charged with murder, Wolfe comes to his rescue. Staten Island would be forgettable were it not for the gleaming Tabernacle of the Silver Spire, where thousands of congregants come every Sunday to hear the sermons of Barnabas Bay. Millions more tune in on television, giving the good Reverend international fame, and a chance to spread the gospel from New York City's harbor all the way to South Korea. But threatening notes have been appearing in the collection bag, suggesting that one of the faithful has decided it's time this good shepherd get the hook. Believing organized religion is nothing more than a scam, rotund sleuth Nero Wolfe refuses to investigate the threats, instead recommending veteran investigator Fred Durkin for the case. But when Durkin is accused of murdering the Reverend's assistant, Wolfe fights to clear his name. He may not be a Christian, but he will always help a brother in need.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 4 of 4
A fairly good mystery, though a bit far-fetched as to what constitutes evidence and circumstantial evidence. It is good to read about the Brownstone and its inhabitants, even though the spark is missing. ( )
  MrsLee | Feb 22, 2024 |
As a book by Robert Goldsborough, this was a good cozy. Good plot, good characterizations and the writing is fine.
As a Nero Wolfe book, it is - okay. There was minimal Nero Wolfe, and lots of Archie. I have no problem with that. But. I love Rex Stout's Archie. Fast talking, smooth with the ladies, big on vernacular, though not always grammatically correct . . . And this Archie just was a hair off. There was minimal slang, not much interaction with the ladies, not much about his sharp dressing - just not quite there.
As for the plot - oh, here be spoilers . . .






One of Nero's part time employees is in trouble. Not just trouble, but in jail on a murder charge. Shades of Orrie Cather in Death of a Doxie! Now in that book, Nero and the entire gang jumps in to save Orrie because he is one of theirs. Orrie had a lot more reason to commit murder, and he was definitely more a murderous type.
But Nero, after consulting with Archie and the boys, accepts his innocence and sets to work proving him innocent. So why, when the much more likeable, and much less likely, Fred Durkin is accused - with far less reason - does Nero take such a back seat, even to the extent of never mentioning Saul, and taking to his room with a 'relapse'.
When he does reluctantly solve the murder, he gets in a car and heads to the scene. His excuse for this outlandish change of the habits of almost a lifetime? He didn't think Archie could get the suspects to the brownstone. 1. Nero rarely thinks Archie can't gather the people - He says do it, and expects it to be done. 2. When he does anticipate reluctance, he has Cramer summon them. But not this time - no, he summons Cramer, unbeknownst to Archie.
No, for me this was not a good example of a Nero Wolfe. ( )
  LeslieHolm | May 19, 2022 |
4/9/22
  laplantelibrary | Apr 9, 2022 |
4/9/22
  laplantelibrary | Apr 9, 2022 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert Goldsboroughprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hallman,TomCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

Nero Wolfe (50.6)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
TO BARBARA STOUT

and

REBECCA STOUT BRADBURY

for their continuing

encouragement and

enthusiasm
First words
With two baritone belches of the horn, the Samuel I. Newhouse eased from its slip at South Ferry, and we were on the briny.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

When a fellow shamus gets charged with murder, Wolfe comes to his rescue. Staten Island would be forgettable were it not for the gleaming Tabernacle of the Silver Spire, where thousands of congregants come every Sunday to hear the sermons of Barnabas Bay. Millions more tune in on television, giving the good Reverend international fame, and a chance to spread the gospel from New York City's harbor all the way to South Korea. But threatening notes have been appearing in the collection bag, suggesting that one of the faithful has decided it's time this good shepherd get the hook. Believing organized religion is nothing more than a scam, rotund sleuth Nero Wolfe refuses to investigate the threats, instead recommending veteran investigator Fred Durkin for the case. But when Durkin is accused of murdering the Reverend's assistant, Wolfe fights to clear his name. He may not be a Christian, but he will always help a brother in need.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.48)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 2
3 10
3.5 2
4 10
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 206,167,342 books! | Top bar: Always visible