HomeGroupsTalkExplore
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Castles in Japan

by Morton S. Schmorleitz

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
12None1,476,776NoneNone
Behind the glossy facade of modern Japan there survive remnants--some of them surprisingly well preserved--of the country's feudal past, of warlords and fighting samurai, of shoguns and sequestered emperors, of princes and peasants. This book vividly presents the castles of Japan, more than 80 of them altogether, ranging geographically from Matsumae on the northern island of Hakkaido to Kagoshima in southern Kyushu The author brings not only an immense knowledge but also a deep feeling for Japan and things Japanese to this sensitive study, formed from both the historian's and the sightseer's perspectives. Most of the Japanese castles, he explains, were built in several amazing decades at the end of the 16th century. The Tokugawa shogunate was then consolidating its power and local lords were girding themselves for the onslaughts of enemies supplied with that recent acquisition fro the West--firearms. Castle architecture, among the most original of Japanese architectural forms, manifested a diabolically shrewd defense capability. An unwary enemy, if unwary he were, might charge into a veritable chamber of horrors--stone-dropping chutes, hidden gates, sharply-curved passageways, flooded moats, trap doors, and floor boards that squeaked to warn of an intruder's arrival. In Japanese style, many even contained special suicide courts.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Behind the glossy facade of modern Japan there survive remnants--some of them surprisingly well preserved--of the country's feudal past, of warlords and fighting samurai, of shoguns and sequestered emperors, of princes and peasants. This book vividly presents the castles of Japan, more than 80 of them altogether, ranging geographically from Matsumae on the northern island of Hakkaido to Kagoshima in southern Kyushu The author brings not only an immense knowledge but also a deep feeling for Japan and things Japanese to this sensitive study, formed from both the historian's and the sightseer's perspectives. Most of the Japanese castles, he explains, were built in several amazing decades at the end of the 16th century. The Tokugawa shogunate was then consolidating its power and local lords were girding themselves for the onslaughts of enemies supplied with that recent acquisition fro the West--firearms. Castle architecture, among the most original of Japanese architectural forms, manifested a diabolically shrewd defense capability. An unwary enemy, if unwary he were, might charge into a veritable chamber of horrors--stone-dropping chutes, hidden gates, sharply-curved passageways, flooded moats, trap doors, and floor boards that squeaked to warn of an intruder's arrival. In Japanese style, many even contained special suicide courts.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 182,839,818 books! | Top bar: Always visible