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Anne of Avonlea (1909)

by L. M. Montgomery

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Anne of Green Gables (2)

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12,357139500 (4.12)281
In this sequel to "Anne of Green Gables," teenage Anne Shirley becomes a schoolteacher in a small village on Prince Edward Island.
Recently added byprivate library, nswlib, brightfame, Kristine04, mbream, BooksInMirror, BRIELEIGH, Tarachel42, Mippy14
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English (136)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  Vietnamese (1)  All languages (139)
Showing 1-5 of 136 (next | show all)
The thing that annoyed me the most about this book was Anne and Marilla loving Davy more than Dora even though he is awful. Like, they shouldn't hate him, but some of the stuff he did was way too extreme (i.e. lock Dora up and then lie about where she is just to scare them) , and I just didn't understand it. He improved in the second half of the book for sure.

My favorite part of L.M. Montgomery's books is her descriptive writing and character writing. This series is very slice of life and cozy. This book especially isn't super plot heavy. I feel like the purpose of this book is more character development for Anne especially but for other characters as well.

The other part I love is the relationship between Gilbert and Anne. I love that their relationship is slow burn. It builds the anticipation, and not having a lot of scenes with them in this book makes the third book that much better.

Super excited for the reread of the next book because it was my favorite in the whole series during my initial read. ( )
  TimeLord10SPW | Jan 18, 2024 |
I just read this for maybe the tenth time and it's still a great comfort to me. It's not as good as Green Gables, but I love how Anne decides to stay with Marilla and it all works out.

I also love Davy. Especially:

"...there'll be plenty of jam in heaven, that's one comfort," he said complacently. "`Because He makes preserves, and redeems us.' Preserves is just a holy way of saying jam." ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
(3.5 / 5)

No longer a child, Anne Shirley starts a new adventure as the schoolteacher in Avonlea. Fortunately (for us, not for her), she still gets into scrapes, has adventures, and meets interesting people. We follow Anne through 2 years as teacher, starting with her first terrifying day. During this time, Green Gables becomes the home for 2 young orphans, who present a whole new challenge to Marilla.

I had anticipated this book being not as wonderful as the first, considering that plenty of the charm of the first was wrapped up in Anne's childish nature. Not only has she grown and matured, she's also been "raised" to be more proper. Still, her spirit and imagination were there, and she met other kindred spirits to provide some of that as well.

I did not care for the twins that Marilla took in, not just because Davy was such a handful, but also because Dora was...nothing. It seemed as if the author only gave Davy a twin so that he would have a target for his shenanigans, but she forgot to develop the sister, and thus, she became boring to the author, and likewise to the other characters. They liked Davy more because he needed them more (because he was a terror), and Dora was so good she had no imagination. So basically, if she'd acted up a little more, or made more mistakes, she'd be more interesting. Just...no.

The storyline with Miss Lavender is cute and sweet. I loved the way Paul Irving keeps saying, "You know, Teacher," to Anne (and a few times, he said the same basic thing to someone else) to show that they were so similar in spirit. J.A. Harrison's storyline was a little bizarre, yet came out nicely.

These books meander so, with time sprawling across the pages, and sometimes it's hard to pinpoint the plot of a single book. But the overall plot seems to be the life of this orphan girl as she learns who she is, how to navigate life, and what she might want to do someday. I'm looking forward to reading about the next chapter of Anne's life. ( )
  Kristi_D | Sep 22, 2023 |
First sentence: A tall, slim girl, "half-past sixteen," with serious gray eyes and hair which her friends called auburn, had sat down on the broad red sandstone doorstep of a Prince Edward Island farmhouse one ripe afternoon in August, firmly resolved to construe so many lines of Virgil.

Premise/plot: Anne Shirley, a YOUNG Anne Shirley, assumes the responsibilities of school teacher and big sister while resuming her roles as kindred spirit, best friend, and daughter. At the end of Anne of Green Gables, Gilbert gallantly offers the Prince Edward Island school to Anne Shirley so that she can remain closer to home so she can care for (an aging) Marilla while she saves money for college. Anne of Avonlea chronicles about two years. She's a teacher...with some memorable students, notably Paul Irving. She's a friend...Mr. Harrison, a grumpy neighbor, is one new friend. But most importantly perhaps, she becomes a "big sister." Marilla takes in TWO children--twins--Davy and Dora. Davy is a HANDFUL and delight. Never a dull day with his troublesome, mischievous adventures/misadventures. Dora is a saint. By the end of the novel, Anne Shirley is ready to head off to college....

My thoughts: I really LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this one. Is it as good as the first book or last book in the series? Probably not. Is it as good as Anne of the Island? Well. It's a toss-up. Because as much as I love and crazy love and adore aspects of Anne of the Island, Anne of Avonlea is just MARVELOUS. And Anne of the Island has its duller moments. Definitely less comedic.

Mr. Harrison about Mrs. Rachel Lynde:

"I detest that woman more than anybody I know. She can put a whole sermon, text, comment, and application, into six words, and throw it at you like a brick."

"I never was much of a talker till I came to Avonlea and then I had to begin in self-defense or Mrs. Lynde would have said I was dumb and started a subscription to have me taught sign language."

Fun with Davy:

"Anne," said Davy, sitting up in bed and propping his chin on his hands, "Anne, where is sleep? People go to sleep every night, and of course I know it's the place where I do the things I dream, but I want to know WHERE it is and how I get there and back without knowing anything about it...and in my nighty too. Where is it?"

"I wish people could live on pudding. Why can't they, Marilla? I want to know."
"Because they'd soon get tired of it."
"I'd like to try that for myself," said skeptical Davy.

Paul Irving to Anne:

"I've prayed every night that God would give me enough grace to enable me to eat every bit of my porridge in the mornings. But I've never been able to do it yet, and whether it's because I have too little grace or too much porridge I really can't decide."

Favorite quotes:

"You're never safe from being surprised till you're dead."

“One can't get over the habit of being a little girl all at once.”

“After all," Anne had said to Marilla once, "I believe the nicest and sweetest days are not those on which anything very splendid or wonderful or exciting happens but just those that bring simple little pleasures, following one another softly, like pearls slipping off a string.”

“Anne had no sooner uttered the phrase, "home o'dreams," than it captivated her fancy and she immediately began the erection of one of her own. It was, of course, tenanted by an ideal master, dark, proud, and melancholy; but oddly enough, Gilbert Blythe persisted in hanging about too, helping her arrange pictures, lay out gardens, and accomplish sundry other tasks which a proud and melancholy hero evidently considered beneath his dignity. Anne tried to banish Gilbert's image from her castle in Spain but, somehow, he went on being there, so Anne, being in a hurry, gave up the attempt and pursued her aerial architecture with such success that her "home o'dreams" was built and furnished before Diana spoke again. ”

“…I think,' concluded Anne, hitting on a very vital truth, 'that we always love best the people who need us.”

“When I think something nice is going to happen I seem to fly right up on the wings of anticipation; and then the first thing I realize I drop down to earth with a thud. But really, Marilla, the flying part is glorious as long as it lasts...it's like soaring through a sunset. I think it almost pays for the thud.”

“It takes all sorts of people to make a world, as I've often heard, but I think there are some who could be spared,' Anne told her reflection in the east gable mirror that night.”

"If we have friends we should look only for the best in them and give them the best that is in us, don't you think? Then friendship would be the most beautiful thing in the world."

"In this world you've just got to hope for the best and prepare for the worst and take whatever God sends." ( )
  blbooks | Sep 11, 2023 |
I loved this book and the first one, but I confess, "Anne" is one exception to the The Book is Always Better rule. ( )
  Kim.Sasso | Aug 27, 2023 |
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» Add other authors (62 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
L. M. Montgomeryprimary authorall editionscalculated
Caruso, BarbaraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Diaz, Jose Garciasecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fraiser, ShellyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibbs, GeorgeIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Klein, LaurieNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McDonough, JohnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Merlington, LauralNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parry, Carolinesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Peltonen, EijaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rioux, HélèneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sarah, MaryNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Savage, KarenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sieffert, ClareIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sieffert, ClareIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stahl, Ben F.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Trepáč, JozefIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vesala, HiljaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, TaraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winton, ColleenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zieleniec, BogdanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Flowers spring to blossom where she walks
The careful ways of duty,
Our hard, stiff lines of life with her
Are flowing curves of beauty.
- Whittier
Dedication
to my former teacher,
Hattie Gordon Smith
in grateful rememberance
of her sympathy and encouragement
First words
A tall, slim girl, "half-past sixteen," with serious gray eyes and hair which her friends called auburn, had sat down on the broad red sandstone doorstep of a Prince Edward Island farmhouse one ripe afternoon in August, firmly resolved to construe so many lines of Virgil.
Quotations
"If you went to your own room at midnight, locked the door, pulled down the blind, and sneezed, Mrs. Lynde would ask you the next day how your cold was!"
Eliza was sewing patchwork, not because it was needed but simply as a protest against the frivolous lace Catherine was crocheting.
"It does people good to have to do things they don't like … in moderation." - - Mr. Harrison
"I was just trying to write out some of my thoughts, as Professor Hamilton advised me, but I couldn't get them to please me. They seem so stiff and foolish directly they're written down on white paper with black ink. Fancies are like shadows… you can't cage them, they're such wayward, dancing things…"
"… You must excuse me, Anne. I've got a habit of being outspoken and folks mustn't mind it."

"But they can't help minding it. And I don’t think it's any help that it's your habit. What would you think of a person who went about sticking pins and needles into people and saying 'Excuse me, you mustn't mind it … it's just a habit I've got.' You'd think he was crazy, wouldn't you?"
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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see Wikipage Anne of Avonlea for a list of ISBNs that have been verified as belonging to the unabridged version of the novel.
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In this sequel to "Anne of Green Gables," teenage Anne Shirley becomes a schoolteacher in a small village on Prince Edward Island.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
The second chapter in the life of Anne Shirley. This book follows Anne from the age of 16 to 18, during the two years that she teaches at Avonlea school. It includes many of the characters from Anne of Green Gables, as well as new ones like Mr. Harrison, Miss Lavendar Lewis, Paul Irving, and the twins Dora and Davy.

Available online at The Hathi Trust:
https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/...

Also available at The Internet Archive:
https://archive.org/details/anneavonle...

Also available at Project Gutenberg:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/47
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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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Tantor Media

2 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 1400100933, 1400108683

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909438944, 1909438952

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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