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Blackwood Farm (The Vampire Chronicles) by…
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Blackwood Farm (The Vampire Chronicles) (original 2002; edition 2002)

by Anne Rice (Author)

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4,421422,281 (3.65)22
In her new novel, perennial bestseller Anne Rice fuses her two uniquely seductive strains of narrative -- her Vampire legend and her lore of the Mayfair witches -- to give us a world of classic deep-south luxury and ancestral secrets. Welcome to Blackwood Farm: soaring white columns, spacious drawing rooms, bright, sun-drenched gardens, and a dark strip of the dense Sugar Devil Swamp. This is the world of Quinn Blackwood, a brilliant young man haunted since birth by a mysterious doppelgänger, “Goblin,” a spirit from a dream world that Quinn can’t escape and that prevents him from belonging anywhere. When Quinn is made a Vampire, losing all that is rightfully his and gaining an unwanted immortality, his doppelgänger becomes even more vampiric and terrifying than Quinn himself. As the novel moves backwards and forwards in time, from Quinn’s boyhood on Blackwood Farm to present day New Orleans, from ancient Athens to 19th-century Naples, Quinn seeks out the legendary Vampire Lestat in the hope of freeing himself from the spectre that draws him inexorably back to Sugar Devil Swamp and the explosive secrets it holds. A story of youth and promise, of loss and the search for love, of secrets and destiny,Blackwood Farmis Anne Rice at her mesmerizing best. From the Hardcover edition.… (more)
Member:RedheadRapunzel
Title:Blackwood Farm (The Vampire Chronicles)
Authors:Anne Rice (Author)
Info:Knopf (2002), Edition: 1st Edition, 544 pages
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Blackwood Farm by Anne Rice (2002)

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English (41)  Spanish (1)  All languages (42)
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
Of all the Vampire Chronicles, this is probably my favorite - after The Vampire Lestat, of course. The story of Tarquin Blackwood in his journey from mortal to vampire is tragically beautiful. The main reason I read this book was that I had heard that Lestat was in it and I was on a binge-read of all things TVL. Much to my surprise, the (former) Brat Prince doesn't really play a large role in this novel but it's no biggie because Tarquin- in the telling of his life story - stole a piece of my heart; his life feels so familiar and while the wry sarcasm that Lestat is known for is missing, Quinn is just as charismatic.

I hope he makes an appearance in the upcoming show for The Vampire Chronicles.

(Off topic but I always thought that Robert Sheehan would make a great Quinn Blackwood!) ( )
  SavoirFaerie | Jun 18, 2022 |
I’ve had a copy of BLACKWOOD FARM on my shelf for a few years, waiting while I made my way through the rest of Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles, with a detour through the three books of The Mayfair Witches. I am a big fan of the former, which contains some of the most impressive world building to be found in horror fantasy, and not so much the latter, which I found indulgent even by Rice’s standards, with a side helping of erotica that wasn’t always to my liking. Nevertheless, with all that reading behind me, I wanted to see what BLACKWOOD FARM would bring forth, as it is a novel with a foot planted in both of Rice’s fictional worlds, which have now come to overlap and merge. In my opinion, we get the best of both in a book that will surely please any hard core Rice fan. There’s no end of the oddness, kinks and quirks, and the downright grotesque that longtime readers have come to expect.

Primarily this book is a vampire story, that vampire being the fledgling Quinn Blackwood, a young man turned into a blood drinker early in life. Young vampire Quinn has a problem named Goblin, a spirit who has haunted him since infancy, a doppelganger and companion whom only Quinn and those like him who are perceptive to spirits, can see, but now that Quinn is a creature of the night, the possessive Goblin has become truly monstrous and impossible to control. Since Quinn is the heir to a palatial farm in Louisiana, it is only natural that this inexperienced vampire journey to New Orleans and seek out Lestat, the brat prince of Undead, Rice’s most famous fictional creation. Of course this sets up one of the author’s most tried and true storytelling tropes, where Quinn sets down and tells Lestat his life’s story up to that moment, which encompasses about 500 pages, as learn the history of the Blackwood family, and of the land they’ve lived on for generations. We meet lots of characters along the way, including a few who cross over from the Mayfair books, and learn a few secrets. In the book’s finale, we learn who Goblin really is, and why he is attached to Quinn.

Like most of Anne Rice’s later books, readers seem to have run hot and cold on BLACKWOOD FARM in equal numbers, but I liked it better than just anything she’s written since THE QUEEN OF THE DAMNED. At this point, you either go with Rice’s style, or you don’t, and if you go with it, then it means overlooking a few flaws, especially her love of detail and description – the reader will know every inch of the Blackwood’s home and the swamp adjacent to it in their minds by the end. Then there is the thing with the cameos. I liked the main character of Quinn, who can come across as an indulged and spoiled little rich boy, one capable of simply going off on a three year tour of the finest and most culturally refined parts of Europe for one section of the story, but I found his earnestness a refreshing change from some of Rice’s other story narrators. My favorite moment in the book is when Quinn, newly made a Blood Hunter by Petronia (definitely not one of my favorite Rice characters), promptly announces that he is not going to be staying among the immortals in Italy, but returning to his human family in Louisiana, and resuming as normal a life as possible among them. I thought Quinn and Mona Mayfair were a wonderful couple (overlooking the fact that she’s only 15 years old), and I found myself rooting for them. Like many of Rice’s novels, this one could have been helped by some editing, though it never plodded along like some of the Mayfair books; there were enough dramatic twists and turns to satisfy me. Rice’s tendency to telegraph how you are to feel about her characters is very evident, everyone loves Aunt Queen, the Blackwood matriarch, while Patsy, Quinn’s errant mother, is to be held in low regard because she hates her son and makes no secret of it. Some plot threads feel underdeveloped, such as Rebecca, the ghost of the mistress of a long gone Blackwood, to whom Quinn loses his virginity. Others, like Quinn’s teenage Uncle Tommy, feel like a story line being planted for a future book. There are some things that just made me shake my head, such as Quinn having elderly Black female servants sleep with him (in a non sexual way) for comfort until he’s nearly an adult. And this book really drove home the fact that Anne Rice, despite her progressive politics, can be a real snob, especially in the way she handles Patsy, whose crime seems to be that she didn’t want to be a properly cultured little rich girl, but instead wanted to have career making low class country and pop music, and Tommy’s mother, Terry Sue, who sin is that she is poor, overweight, lives in a trailer, and can’t stop having children.

Like many other reviewers, I felt that Lestat had simply been shoe horned into the narrative to please the fans; his contribution to the story is fairly minimal. There are appearances by Rowan Mayfair and Michael Curry, the main characters from the Witches trilogy, and it is still apparent that Curry is Rice’s ideal man in the way she lovingly gives a physical description. Oncle Julian Mayfair shows up at one point, reminding me why he is one of my Top Five Anne Rice characters. For those not that familiar with Rice, it is not necessary to have read all of her previous books before opening BLACKWOOD FARM, but I would recommend reading INERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE and THE VAMPIRE LESTAT before cracking this one. Anyway, I’m looking forward to BLOOD CANTICLE; the next volume in Anne Rice’s enduring series, and seeing what she has in store for these characters. ( )
  wb4ever1 | Sep 18, 2021 |
hb
  5083mitzi | Mar 20, 2021 |
Anne Rice has stated she wants book reviewers to be required to post with their full, real name. In response, I am removing all my reviews of her novels as I am unable and unwilling to do this. I am no longer comfortable reading or reviewing her work. Thank you.
  kaitlynn_g | Dec 13, 2020 |
Tarquin Blackwood, young vampire and heir to the impossibly rich Blackwood estate in Louisiana, recounts his life story to the vampire Lestat. He has spent his life haunted by a spirit named Goblin - a spirit who looks remarkably like himself - and would now be rid of it.

This book is primarily told in flashback style, with the only current action at the beginning and end of the book. I felt that it detracted from the intensity of the novel. Telling a story in the past tense gives a different mood to the novel and I would have preferred a current, what-is-happening-now type of story. I was also disappointed that Lestat did not play a bigger role in this book. Quinn, for me, was not that likable of a character. There was nothing wrong with him per se (well, he was a bit weird but it's Anne Rice and he's a vampire, so that goes without saying) but he did not strike me as someone I would want to hang out with. Too emotional, perhaps? Too impetuous? Too haunted and strange?

I have read Interview with the Vampire and The Vampire Lestat and I started The Witching Hour but did not finish it. I was happy about the mingling of the Mayfair witches with this story. I did not really care for the Goblin story. Goblin is creepy. Goblin is supposed to be creepy. I, however, found I liked the story better when Goblin was in the background or out of the picture.

Overall, this novel failed to "wow" me. It was an okay story with special guest appearances by our favorite vampire and our favorite witch family, but as for Quinn Blackwood - well, I just don't really care what happens to him after this. I am interested enough to try reading some of the other books in this vampire series. ( )
  Chica3000 | Dec 11, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anne Riceprimary authorall editionscalculated
Pittu, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
My days have passed away, my
  thoughts are dissipated, tormenting my
  heart.
They have turned night into day,
  and after darkness I hope for light again.
If I wait hell is my house, and I have
  made my bed in darkness.
I have said to rottenness: thou art
  my father; to worms, my mother and
  my sister.
Where is now then my expectation
  and who considereth my patience?
All that I have shall go down into
  the deepest pit: thinkest thou that there
  at least I shall have rest?
                              JOB 17:11 - 16 DV. 
Dedication
Dedicated to my son, Christopher Rice
First words
Lestat, If you find this letter in your house in Rue Royale, and I do sincerely think you will find it-- you'll know at once that I have broken your rules.
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In her new novel, perennial bestseller Anne Rice fuses her two uniquely seductive strains of narrative -- her Vampire legend and her lore of the Mayfair witches -- to give us a world of classic deep-south luxury and ancestral secrets. Welcome to Blackwood Farm: soaring white columns, spacious drawing rooms, bright, sun-drenched gardens, and a dark strip of the dense Sugar Devil Swamp. This is the world of Quinn Blackwood, a brilliant young man haunted since birth by a mysterious doppelgänger, “Goblin,” a spirit from a dream world that Quinn can’t escape and that prevents him from belonging anywhere. When Quinn is made a Vampire, losing all that is rightfully his and gaining an unwanted immortality, his doppelgänger becomes even more vampiric and terrifying than Quinn himself. As the novel moves backwards and forwards in time, from Quinn’s boyhood on Blackwood Farm to present day New Orleans, from ancient Athens to 19th-century Naples, Quinn seeks out the legendary Vampire Lestat in the hope of freeing himself from the spectre that draws him inexorably back to Sugar Devil Swamp and the explosive secrets it holds. A story of youth and promise, of loss and the search for love, of secrets and destiny,Blackwood Farmis Anne Rice at her mesmerizing best. From the Hardcover edition.

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