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Ancient Fiction: The Matrix of Early Christian And Jewish Narrative…

by Jo-Ann A. Brant (Editor), Charles W. Hedrick (Editor), Chris Shea (Editor)

Other authors: J.R.C. Cousland (Contributor), Ruben Rene Dupertuis (Contributor), Noah Hacham (Contributor), Ronald F. Hock (Contributor), Tawny L. Holm (Contributor)8 more, Sara R. Johnson (Contributor), Jared W. Ludlow (Contributor), Dennis R. MacDonald (Contributor), Chaim Milikowsky (Contributor), Judith B. Perkins (Contributor), Richard I. Pervo (Contributor), Andy Reimer (Contributor), Gerhard van den Heever (Contributor)

Series: Society of Biblical Literature Symposium Series (32)

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The essays in this volume examine the relationship between ancient fiction in the Greco-Roman world and early Jewish and Christian narratives. They consider how those narratives imitated or exploited conventions of fiction to produce forms of literature that expressed new ideas or shaped community identity within the shifting social and political climates of their own societies. Major authors and texts surveyed include Chariton, Shakespeare, Homer, Vergil, Plato, Matthew, Mark, Luke, Daniel, 3 Maccabees, the Testament of Abraham, rabbinic midrash, the Apocryphal Acts, Ezekiel the Tragedian, and the Sophist Aelian. This diverse collection reveals and examines prevalent issues and syntheses in the making: the pervasive use and subversive power of imitation, the distinction between fiction and history, and the use of history in the expression of identity.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Brant, Jo-Ann A.Editorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hedrick, Charles W.Editormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Shea, ChrisEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Cousland, J.R.C.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dupertuis, Ruben ReneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hacham, NoahContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hock, Ronald F.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Holm, Tawny L.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Johnson, Sara R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ludlow, Jared W.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
MacDonald, Dennis R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Milikowsky, ChaimContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Perkins, Judith B.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pervo, Richard I.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Reimer, AndyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
van den Heever, GerhardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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The essays in this volume examine the relationship between ancient fiction in the Greco-Roman world and early Jewish and Christian narratives. They consider how those narratives imitated or exploited conventions of fiction to produce forms of literature that expressed new ideas or shaped community identity within the shifting social and political climates of their own societies. Major authors and texts surveyed include Chariton, Shakespeare, Homer, Vergil, Plato, Matthew, Mark, Luke, Daniel, 3 Maccabees, the Testament of Abraham, rabbinic midrash, the Apocryphal Acts, Ezekiel the Tragedian, and the Sophist Aelian. This diverse collection reveals and examines prevalent issues and syntheses in the making: the pervasive use and subversive power of imitation, the distinction between fiction and history, and the use of history in the expression of identity.

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