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Vimalakirti Nirdesa Sutra by Lu K'uan Yu…
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Vimalakirti Nirdesa Sutra (edition 1972)

by Lu K'uan Yu (Charles Luk: trans./edit)

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One of the most popular Asian classics for roughly two thousand years, the Vimalakirti Sutra stands out among the sacred texts of Mahayana Buddhism for its conciseness, its vivid and humorous episodes, its dramatic narratives, and its eloquent exposition of the key doctrine of emptiness or nondualism. Unlike most sutras, its central figure is not a Buddha but a wealthy townsman, who, in his mastery of doctrine and religious practice, epitomizes the ideal lay believer. For this reason, the sutra has held particular significance for men and women of the laity in Buddhist countries of Asia, assuring them that they can reach levels of spiritual attainment fully comparable to those accessible to monks and nuns of the monastic order. Esteemed translator Burton Watson has rendered a beautiful English translation from the popular Chinese version produced in 406 C.E. by the Central Asian scholar-monk Kumarajiva, which is widely acknowledged to be the most felicitous of the various Chinese translations of the sutra (the Sanskrit original of which was lost long ago) and is the form in which it has had the greatest influence in China, Japan, and other countries of East Asia. Watson's illuminating introduction discusses the background of the sutra, its place in the development of Buddhist thought, and the profundities of its principal doctrine: emptiness.… (more)
Member:Miguelit0
Title:Vimalakirti Nirdesa Sutra
Authors:Lu K'uan Yu (Charles Luk: trans./edit)
Info:Shambhala Publications, Inc
Collections:Your library
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Tags:mahayana buddhism

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Vimalakirti Nirdesa Sutra by Vimalakirti

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This classic scripture of Mahayana Buddhism and Zen emphasizes spiritual practice in the midst of secular life. Composed in about the second century CE, The Vimalakirti Nirdesa Sutra tells the story of a householder named Vimalakirti who lived a worldly life while following the Bodhisattva path. This sutra is particularly applicable to Western students of Buddhism because it teaches that people in the secular life can practice Buddhism as effectively as members of monastic communities.
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Vimalakirtiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Boin-Webb, SaraTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lamotte, √ČtienneTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thurman, Robert A. F.Translatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Watson, BurtonTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Respectfully dedicated to
THE VENERABLE UPASAKA W. B. PICARD
Head of the Mousehole Buddhist Group,
Mousehole, Cornwall, England,
whose encouragement has sustained my
humble efforts to present translations of
Chinese Buddhist texts
to keen students of the Dharma
in the West
[Luk translation]
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One of the most popular Asian classics for roughly two thousand years, the Vimalakirti Sutra stands out among the sacred texts of Mahayana Buddhism for its conciseness, its vivid and humorous episodes, its dramatic narratives, and its eloquent exposition of the key doctrine of emptiness or nondualism. Unlike most sutras, its central figure is not a Buddha but a wealthy townsman, who, in his mastery of doctrine and religious practice, epitomizes the ideal lay believer. For this reason, the sutra has held particular significance for men and women of the laity in Buddhist countries of Asia, assuring them that they can reach levels of spiritual attainment fully comparable to those accessible to monks and nuns of the monastic order. Esteemed translator Burton Watson has rendered a beautiful English translation from the popular Chinese version produced in 406 C.E. by the Central Asian scholar-monk Kumarajiva, which is widely acknowledged to be the most felicitous of the various Chinese translations of the sutra (the Sanskrit original of which was lost long ago) and is the form in which it has had the greatest influence in China, Japan, and other countries of East Asia. Watson's illuminating introduction discusses the background of the sutra, its place in the development of Buddhist thought, and the profundities of its principal doctrine: emptiness.

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