HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

A Dance to the Music of Time: Third Movement, Autumn

by Anthony Powell

Series: A Dance to the Music of Time (Omnibus 7-9)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8571421,679 (4.19)53
Anthony Powell's brilliant twelve-novel sequence chronicles the lives of over three hundred characters, and is a unique evocation of life in twentieth-century England. It is unrivalled for its scope, its humour and the enormous pleasure it has given to generations. Volume 3 contains the seventh, eighth and ninth novel in the series- The Valley of Bones; The Soldier's Art; The Military Philosophers… (more)
  1. 01
    The Sword of Honour Trilogy by Evelyn Waugh (thorold)
    thorold: Evelyn Waugh's Sword of honour trilogy covers much the same ground as the 3rd quarter of A dance to the music of time, based on their authors' experiences as slightly elderly and very unmilitary junior officers during World War II.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 53 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
I am trying to read the whole series over the course of a year by reading one volume each months. This book collects the 7th to 9th volumes. These books primarily cover World War II and Nicholas Jenkins having to become an officer. The same characters keep cropping up and Kenneth Widmerpool in particular is increasingly monstrous throughout this section. I did find this section less fun than the previous 2, I'm just less interested in the male world of the army and war than in the London nightlife I guess. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Feb 20, 2022 |
In Powell's inimitable style, the three books of Volume 3, encompass WWII. Nicholas Jenkins, our narrator, continues to share his internal monologue. Many characters, new and old, populate these years. The reader is privy to the absurdities, the humanity, the vanity and selfishness, of former society scions coming face to face with themselves, with war, with reversal of circumstances, with kindness, with cruelty and with the sheer exhaustion of individuals and nations after six years of war. Powell's capacity to share the minutiae of daily life and the inner psychological pondering of the narrator can occasionally feel Dickensian, so bear that in mind when taking this volume, and the others, on. I thoroughly enjoyed this volume! ( )
  hemlokgang | Jun 8, 2021 |
I learn I am not immortal ( )
  farrhon | Jan 25, 2021 |
The Valley of Bones:
It's a tailor's war
not for old duffers like Nick
he's a daddy now.

The Soldier's Art:
Bombs and bed-hopping
Nick's French costs him a new job
it's good to have friends.

The Military Philosophers:
The infamous Pam
breaker of powerful balls
Kenneth's perfect girl. ( )
  Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
(18) The third collection of 3 novels - Nick is now in the Army during WW2. These novels focus almost exclusively around army life and the characters he meets therein. It is not surprising that Nick doesn't see any action and is relagated to bureaucratic and diplomatic positions given his age and education. He starts out as a minor officer in an Infantry Division in the first novel, then gets transferred to 'Headquarters' where he becomes none other than Widmerpool's assistant. And finally, he is promoted and seems to be working with military attaches from other countries doing various things. Of course, during all these adventures his paths cross with all his old familiars. While Nick escapes unscathed, not so for many of the characters we have come to know.

I think this is my favorite of the collections so far. I was able to relate to even some of his most dense elegiac passages when he was musing on life (though I will never get all the literary allusions and have given up trying. . .) The subtle humor with the exquisite descriptions of individuals and their foibles is impressive - I loved the scene of the two colonels (the owl and the dog) exchanging conversation in the presence of the general at dinner. Powell conveyed such tension and rivalry with just the exchange of a few sentences about a glass of port. And Widmerpool is such a tool! His narcissism is both annoying and amusing. I have stopped wishing to get to know Isobel better and as I predicted, nary a word about the child. Even as a space of 6 years goes by during the War - Nick doesn't once mention his kids name!

These novels are not easy reads and not for everyone but I am thoroughly enjoying them now. As I am used to the authors style and turns of phrase now, it is not taking me as long to read them. They capture a generality regarding one's lived experiences with the passage of time and stages of life, as well as the particulars of upper class life during the early 20th century in England. ( )
  jhowell | Apr 7, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Arthur and Rosemary
First words
Snow from yesterday's fall still lay in patches and the morning air was glacial.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Omnibus volume of:

7 -- The Valley of Bones;
8 -- The Soldier’s Art; and
9 -- The Military Philosophers.

NOTE: The Simon Vance audiobook, combined here, is unabridged.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Anthony Powell's brilliant twelve-novel sequence chronicles the lives of over three hundred characters, and is a unique evocation of life in twentieth-century England. It is unrivalled for its scope, its humour and the enormous pleasure it has given to generations. Volume 3 contains the seventh, eighth and ninth novel in the series- The Valley of Bones; The Soldier's Art; The Military Philosophers

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.19)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 17
3.5 12
4 46
4.5 8
5 56

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,147,289 books! | Top bar: Always visible