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The Very Rich Hours of Adrienne Monnier

by Adrienne Monnier

Other authors: RIchard McDougall (Translator)

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751297,826 (3.25)1
In 1920s Paris, Adrienne Monnier provided a focal point for the writers and artists drawn to the Left Bank. Her bookstore in the Rue de l'Odeon was aptly called La Maison des Amis des Livres. Monnier took a simple though sophisticated delight in language, books, art, music, nature, friendship, and food. Her 1940 journal, written as Paris fell to the Germans and originally published in 1976, is a rich tapestry of essays, reviews, and personal recollections. She goes to lunch with Colette, visits T. S. Eliot, befriends Joyce, argues with Breton, takes walks with Gide, publishes her elegant reviews, and reflects on the ballet, opera, Steinberg drawings, Marlon Brando and Alec Guinness movies, and the country of her birth.… (more)
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» See also 1 mention

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  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
"Superbly crafted, at once painstaking and daring, this book will make it impossible to consider Modernism henceforth apart from the important and problematic work of such American women as Gertrude Stein, H.D., Mina Loy, and Djuna Barnes, as well as the various contributions of Sylvia Beach, Natalie Barney, and others.... The book is an inspiration, setting a standard for literary history and feminist criticism that will be difficult to surpass"
added by Shonamarie | editAmerican Literature
 
"... presents the women who left their enduring mark on the cultural milieu of a nation. Through their writings, including unpublished and newly available documentary sources of the period, Djuna Barnes, Nancy Cunard, Jean Rhys, Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton and others are revealed as significant in the development of modernism, imagism and other avant-garde movements in which they were overshadowed or ignored by their male counterparts.... Benstock tracks the sexually liberated lifestyles and the creative originality of these women with a wealth of documentation."
added by Shonamarie | editPublishers Weekly
 
"Women of the Left Bank is perhaps the most exciting book I’ve held in my hands all fall. It details and describes the lives (and relationships) of a community of women in Paris (1900-1940) that strongly parallels the feminist writing, publishing, thought-shaking community of our own times..."
added by Shonamarie | editFeminist Bookstore News
 
"Shari Benstock... weaves together, with great skill, the histories of an extraordinary group of talented women--publishers like Sylvia Beach, Caresse Crosby, Margaret Anderson, and Jane Heap, novelists Jean Rhys, Gertrude Stein, and Edith Wharton. She examines in some depth the writing produced by poets, journalists and novelists, thus combining literary criticism and social history in a seamless running narrative.... A valuable and intriguing book."
added by Shonamarie | editNational Public Radio
 

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Adrienne Monnierprimary authorall editionscalculated
McDougall, RIchardTranslatorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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In 1920s Paris, Adrienne Monnier provided a focal point for the writers and artists drawn to the Left Bank. Her bookstore in the Rue de l'Odeon was aptly called La Maison des Amis des Livres. Monnier took a simple though sophisticated delight in language, books, art, music, nature, friendship, and food. Her 1940 journal, written as Paris fell to the Germans and originally published in 1976, is a rich tapestry of essays, reviews, and personal recollections. She goes to lunch with Colette, visits T. S. Eliot, befriends Joyce, argues with Breton, takes walks with Gide, publishes her elegant reviews, and reflects on the ballet, opera, Steinberg drawings, Marlon Brando and Alec Guinness movies, and the country of her birth.

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In 1920s Paris, Adrienne Monnier provided a focal point for the writers and artists drawn to the Left Bank. Her bookstore in the Rue de l’Odeon was aptly called La Maison des Amis des Livres.
Monnier took a simple though sophisticated delight in language, books, art, music, nature, friendship, and food. Her 1940 journal, written as Paris fell to the Germans and originally published in 1976, is a rich tapestry of essays, reviews, and personal recollections. She goes to lunch with Colette, visits T. S. Eliot, befriends Joyce, argues with Breton, takes walks with Gide, publishes her elegant reviews, and reflects on the ballet, opera, Steinberg drawings, Marlon Brando and Alec Guinness movies, and the country of her birth.
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