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Brave New World and Brave New World…
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Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited (original 1932; edition 2005)

by Aldous Huxley, Christopher Hitchens (Foreword)

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3,602362,735 (4.06)29
The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future-of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Huxley's most enduring masterpiece. Following Brave New World is the nonfiction work Brave New World Revisited, first published in 1958. It is a fascinating work in which Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with the prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World, including threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion.… (more)
Member:rettjs01
Title:Brave New World and Brave New World Revisited
Authors:Aldous Huxley
Other authors:Christopher Hitchens (Foreword)
Info:Harper Perennial Modern Classics (2005), Paperback, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
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Brave New World & Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley (Author) (1932)

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English (33)  Italian (2)  French (1)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
In my opinion, this is just a different (and poorly executed) take on Orwell's 1984 where instead of everyone living in a kind of abject misery the majority of the populace live in ignorant bliss. In this universe, there are no parents or siblings because everyone is created through a complicated stem cell process wherein the entire operation is almost entirely executed via test tubes. (There's also entire underclasses of 'subhuman' beings purposefully made malformed and possessing low intelligence to complete tasks of drudgery. Yes, it's horrible.) The upper echelons are afforded every privilege including a drug called soma which acts as a mind-altering substance to keep the populace compliant and happy. (And let's not forget to mention the rampant promiscuity that is encouraged from childhood in the form of 'erotic play'.)

This book is like if you took all the worst things you can think of, threw it into a blender, and ended up with a load of sludge that for some reason is touted as a delicious milkshake. (Yowza that metaphor got away from me.) I think what really got my goat the most (I was going to say frustrated me but if I'm honest I'm pissed I wasted my time with this one) was the ending. If you bother to read this (and why would you unless you have to for a class?) then please let me know what you thought of the ending because I swear I finished the book and said to myself, "Am I an idiot? Did I miss something here?"

To soothe my soul and remind me how a classic can truly earn its moniker I'm now rereading A Tale of Two Cities by my fave Charlie D. ( )
  AliceaP | Aug 31, 2021 |
I'd have enjoyed this quite a bit more if it weren't for the spoiler to end all spoilers that Aldous Huxley included in his introduction. Sigh.... ( )
  Zoes_Human | Jul 23, 2021 |
A travelogue through an imagined future dys-/u-topia.

From what we are told in the story there was a long war that led to a strong desire to reform everything about society and eliminate every possible source of disruption and discomfort. Thus there is no more parenthood; people are bred in specific tiers (alpha through gamma) to participate in society at various levels and are trained to do specific kinds of work. They are given drugs to make them feel happy and entertainment to satisfy them. Science is exalted, and Ford is apparently the materialist god of these people; but even then all in moderation, and knowledge is heavily controlled.

We meet certain individuals who happen to go on a trip to see some "savages" in New Mexico, USA. While there they come upon a woman who had lived among them but had been abandoned; in the meantime, she has given birth to a son, named John, also known as "the Savage." Permission is granted to bring them back to London and to the "civilized" world. He is paraded around; he is desired; he ends up having a long discourse with the head honcho which ultimately is really the point of the book: a frank discussion of why knowledge, literature, etc. has been so circumscribed, and what happens when security is always chosen over autonomy. The System is maintained; the Savage eventually runs off and becomes a greater spectacle. He ends himself in a fit of violence while those watching him mimic the violence.

If you're expecting a great story, you will find this book disappointing: the narrative isn't great. The text screams the late 1920s and early 1930s: cynical and despondent as after 1918, yet before the horrors of the mid-1930s and afterward, set in a bourgeoisie world in which Marxism remained an acceptable liberal fantasy.

But the reason for the perseverance of the work is certainly valid: a secure utopia is really an individual dystopia. One can compare and contrast Huxley and Orwell, and one will likely realize that we're already realizing a synthesized version. So come and read for the depressing legitimacy of the fictive endeavor, but not because the story is that great. ( )
  deusvitae | May 29, 2021 |
copertina non corrisponde
questo è il seguito di...
  perseveranza | Apr 9, 2021 |
Romanzo ***
Saggi ***** ( )
  Atticus06 | Jun 9, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
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A squat grey building of only thirty-four stories.
Chronic remorse, as all the moralists are agreed, is a most undesirable sentiment.  (Preface)
In 1931, when Brave New World was being written, I was convinced that there was still plenty of time.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future-of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Huxley's most enduring masterpiece. Following Brave New World is the nonfiction work Brave New World Revisited, first published in 1958. It is a fascinating work in which Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with the prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World, including threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion.

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