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How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1944)

by Dale Carnegie

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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3,115364,340 (3.98)7
Psychology. Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:Stop worrying and take the steps to a happier, more fulfilling life!
Through Dale Carnegie's six-million-copy bestseller recently revised, millions of people have been helped to overcome the worry habit. Dale Carnegie offers a set of practical formulas you can put to work today. In our fast-paced worldâ??formulas that will last a lifetime!

Discover how to:

-Eliminate fifty percent of business worries immediately
-Reduce financial worries
-Avoid fatigue
-Add one hour a day to your waking life
-Find yourself and be yourselfâ??remember there is no one else on earth like you!

How to Stop Worrying and Start Living deals with fundamental emotions and ideas. It is fascinating to read and easy to apply. Let it change and improve you. There's no need to live with worry and anxiety that keep you from enjoying a full, active and happy
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» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
No matter what happens, always be yourself. ( )
  muhammadishaque | Aug 17, 2023 |
I read less than 100 pages of this book. Didn't even make it halfway. But I didn't need to. The first 2 tips have really been a game-changer for me, and I'm pretty satisfied with how they have helped me manage my worrying. If I feel like those strategies aren't working for me anymore, I will absolutely go back to the library for this book and get another few tips.

FYI this book is mostly composed of anecdotes. After reading of 2 or 3 cases where a particular strategy has helped a person, you can definitely skim to the next chapter if you so choose and not miss a thing. ( )
  blueskygreentrees | Jul 30, 2023 |
3.5

A little too preachy for my liking. Good advice but it keeps coming back around to “pray and you’ll feel better”. A little disappointed seeing as how How to Win Friends and Influence People was a 5 star book for me. ( )
  kylecarroll | Jul 8, 2023 |
Wow this was long! But good. It's actually one of the only anxiety books I've ever read that I'm thinking is worth a re-read at some point.

But first, a little light-hearted critique:
* Dale Carnegie is a Buzzfeed writer before there were such things. ("If you have a worry problem, apply the magic formula of Willis H. Carrier." "Seven Ways to Peace and Happiness", "If You Do This, You Will Never Worry About Ingratitude", "How to Cure Melancholy in Fourteen Days").
* Dale Carnegie is also your mother who knows exactly where you're off base and is talking to you kindly but firmly about how to Straighten Up.
Yeah, it's an interesting tone. It's a bit... folksy? Is that the right word? I think so. You definitely feel as if he knows who he's talking to. And it's you.

BUT. In spite of the fact that I chuckled/cringed at some things...
He makes a lot of solid practical points, and he says them in a way that makes me sit up and take notice. I think since he was writing decades before the market was flooded with formulaic self-help books written in a detached clinical voice, his text stands out as truly unique and memorable. And some of his points have actually popped into my head during anxious moments, days after reading about them. I honestly think I will remember and use some of this stuff.

One of my favorite points came early on. And, you guessed it, it's "the magic formula of Willis H. Carrier." ;) Yeah, I'm not crazy about that label. But the chapter is very thought-provoking. We worrywarts spend a lot of time distressed about terrible but vague outcomes. The advice here is to try and define to yourself what is the worst logical outcome in this situation... face up to it, mentally prepare to accept it if you have to, but then calmly proceed to improve upon the worst.

Related to that is another chapter on cooperating with the inevitable. It's exhausting to think you can control the uncontrollable, you know? I have that problem sometimes. Especially in a COVID world. So this chapter is about stopping that mindset. It doesn't mean giving up when there's a chance to make something better. But, if it's truly something that can't be changed... well, as he says, "No one living has enough emotion and vigour to fight the inevitable and, at the same time, enough left over to create a new life." I'm reviewing the chapter now, and I have to say, it's powerful stuff.

Dale Carnegie includes lots of real-life stories that illustrate what he's talking about. Some of them are very poignant, and some of them seem a little over-hyped. And some of them are just a product of their time. Like the short article, "I Was Acting Like an Hysterical Woman," by Cameron Shipp. Whew. Glad he got some help for that. I guess Hysterical Men hadn't been invented yet.

(Note: There are definitely some instances of gender and racial stereotyping that stand out glaringly to a modern reader.)

But all in all, this was a solid, straightforward read for anxious people, and in my opinion, way more engaging (if also occasionally snort-inducing) than most current books on the subject. So much so that I'm considering getting a hard copy so I can review and highlight some things. ( )
  Alishadt | Feb 25, 2023 |
Some useful advice, but I couldn't get past the repetitiveness and casual sexism. ( )
  BibliophageOnCoffee | Aug 12, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Key takeaways
1. Worrying never solves the problem. It only adds onto it
As human beings, we are bound to worry. We worry about countless things. How do I speak in front of 100 people tomorrow!? I haven’t studied for my tomorrow’s exams, what to do now!? I wasn’t aware that I spent 4 hours on social media!! It’s already 4 AM, yet I cannot sleep. Panic! Panic! Panic!!!

These were a few worry traps that you may have experienced. Think about your own situations when you had worried a lot. Has worry ever solved your problem? Worry only expanded your problem, didn’t it?

Carnegie argues that we waste a lot of time thinking about our problems. We think of all the terrible consequences we could face in our problems. We rarely think about the solution part.

When faced with insomnia, we check our clock constantly. We then think all the bad things that could happen the following day due to lack of sleep. At that moment, we all know that forgetting about everything and falling asleep is the most crucial task to do. Yet, we fail to do that.

To read more, Please visit https://proinvestivity.com/2020/08/15/...
 

» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dale Carnegieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kortemeier, S.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Larsen, Magda H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This book is dedicated to a man who doesn't need to read it - Lowell Thomas
Thirty five years ago, I was one of the unhappiest lads in New York.
First words
In the spring of 1871, a young man picked up a book and read twenty-one words that had a profound effect on his future.
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Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand. - Thomas Carlyle
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Psychology. Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:Stop worrying and take the steps to a happier, more fulfilling life!
Through Dale Carnegie's six-million-copy bestseller recently revised, millions of people have been helped to overcome the worry habit. Dale Carnegie offers a set of practical formulas you can put to work today. In our fast-paced worldâ??formulas that will last a lifetime!

Discover how to:

-Eliminate fifty percent of business worries immediately
-Reduce financial worries
-Avoid fatigue
-Add one hour a day to your waking life
-Find yourself and be yourselfâ??remember there is no one else on earth like you!

How to Stop Worrying and Start Living deals with fundamental emotions and ideas. It is fascinating to read and easy to apply. Let it change and improve you. There's no need to live with worry and anxiety that keep you from enjoying a full, active and happy

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