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How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1944)

by Dale Carnegie

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,589304,416 (3.98)7
This book can change your life! Through Dale Carnegie's six-million-copy bestseller recently revised, millions of people have been helped to overcome the worry habit. Dale Carnegie offers a set of practical formulas you can put to work today. In our fast-paced world--formulas that will last a lifetime! Discover how to: Eliminate fifty percent of business worries immediately Reduce financial worries Avoid fatigue--and keep looking you Add one hour a day to your waking life Find yourself and be yourself--remember there is no one else on earth like you! How to Stop Worrying and Start Living deals with fundamental emotions and ideas. It is fascinating to read and easy to apply. Let it change and improve you. There's no need to live with worry and anxiety that keep you from enjoying a full, active and happy life!… (more)
  1. 00
    Self-Help That Works: Resources to Improve Emotional Health and Strengthen Relationships by John C. Norcross (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Also Not Recommended and rated one star (out of five). In other words, don’t waste your time.
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» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
Carnegie presents interesting methods or avoiding worry but spends too much time proselytizing for Christianity. I did not like all of the religious aspects of his book but appreciate some of the methods he outlines for avoiding worry. It is an easy read full of anecdotes but way too much religion. ( )
  tjhistorian | Sep 4, 2019 |
I've long been a fan of Dale Carnegie and has wisdom, and like the other books I've read of his, I enjoyed this one very much as well. His book did indeed allow me to stop worrying and start living. Some of his advice has stuck with me over time and re-emerged during my day-to-day struggles. In that way, I know that his words of wisdom have truly infiltrated my mind and impacted my life in a positive way.

The chapter that proved most beneficial to me was the one on "How to Keep from Worrying about Insomnia." For as long as I can remember, I've always had trouble sleeping. I would wake up tired, drained and worry about not having enough energy to get through the day. This was always a source of pain and suffering for me, until I read this book. Everything he pointed out regarding this topic rang so true to me and allowed me to relax into my circumstance. I learned how to look at my situation differently and how to build a different relationship with my difficult sleep pattern. Over time, I eradicated my sleeping problem altogether, simply because I employed his methodology of thinking. For this fact alone, I am so grateful for having read this. What a gem of a book. For anyone who worries and often overthinks, this book is for you!
  Syeu715 | Jul 27, 2019 |
Using platitudes and testimonials, Dale Carnegie attempts to tell you how to free yourself from worry. It's well written, but it was written in the 1940's, and it shows; mostly in how it treats women. All of the advice is useful and applicable though. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
Common sense plus storytelling plus true stories plus Jesus. Do you still wonder why this is still a perennial seller? I got bored before reaching 50 percent 😒 ( )
  lucaconti | Jan 24, 2019 |
This book was first published in 1953 and was the kind of book that my late father had on his bookshelf. I noticed them and though they looked interesting, but was too young to realize that I would one day be reading them too!

The book has timeless validity. We will presumably always need to know how to conquer worry and live our life.

It is dated since the famous people it mentions are ones we no longer remember or perhaps never knew.

As well as noted people of years past, the author recounts the stories of persons of his acquaintance, stories that illustrate his claims.

The first rule we’re given by which to combat worry is to live in “day—tight compartments”, i.e. stop worrying about the past and speculating about the future but just deal calmly with what we need to do today! I had already begun to do this, or rather I had begun to only start thinking about how to cope with a certain problem the day before, or whenever necessary, and not before.

Rule 2 is, ask yourself “What is the worst that can possibly happen?” Prepare to accept it if you have to, and proceed to improve on the worst.

Rule 2 is to remind yourself of the exorbitant price you can pay for worry in terms of your health. Those who don’t know how to fight worry die young.

The author suggest a method by which to banish 99% of your worries. Write down precisely what you’re worrying about. Write down what you can do about it. Decide what to do. Start immediately to carry out your decision.

Further advice is, keep busy. Don’t fuss about trifles and ask yourself “What are the odds against this thing’s happening at all?

The author also gives us a programme called “Just for today”. 1. “Just for today I will be happy.” 2. “Just for today I will try to adjust myself to what is.” Etc, etc.

He has a chapter about the high cost of getting even with our enemies. If we try to do so, we will hurt ourselves far more than we hurt them.

We should not expect gratitude but give for the joy of giving. Jesus healed ten lepers in one day, and only one thanked him. Why should we expect more gratitude than Jesus got? If we want our children to be grateful, we must train them to be so.

Count your blessings, not your troubles.

We should not imitate others, but find ourselves and be ourselves.

One chapter is entitled “How to cure depression in fourteen days”. If you forget yourself in service to others you will find the joy of loving.

The best parts of the book are the many stories illustrating how many found success by doing what the author suggests.

The book concludes with 31 true stories of people who conquered worry.

To sum up, though the book is old and dated, it provides invaluable advice to those who worry excessively, that is, many of us.

If worrying is your problem, read this book. ( )
  IonaS | Nov 23, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
Key takeaways
1. Worrying never solves the problem. It only adds onto it
As human beings, we are bound to worry. We worry about countless things. How do I speak in front of 100 people tomorrow!? I haven’t studied for my tomorrow’s exams, what to do now!? I wasn’t aware that I spent 4 hours on social media!! It’s already 4 AM, yet I cannot sleep. Panic! Panic! Panic!!!

These were a few worry traps that you may have experienced. Think about your own situations when you had worried a lot. Has worry ever solved your problem? Worry only expanded your problem, didn’t it?

Carnegie argues that we waste a lot of time thinking about our problems. We think of all the terrible consequences we could face in our problems. We rarely think about the solution part.

When faced with insomnia, we check our clock constantly. We then think all the bad things that could happen the following day due to lack of sleep. At that moment, we all know that forgetting about everything and falling asleep is the most crucial task to do. Yet, we fail to do that.

To read more, Please visit https://proinvestivity.com/2020/08/15/...
 

» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dale Carnegieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kortemeier, S.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Larsen, Magda H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This book is dedicated to a man who doesn't need to read it - Lowell Thomas
Thirty five years ago, I was one of the unhappiest lads in New York.
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In the spring of 1871, a young man picked up a book and read twenty-one words that had a profound effect on his future.
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Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand. - Thomas Carlyle
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This book can change your life! Through Dale Carnegie's six-million-copy bestseller recently revised, millions of people have been helped to overcome the worry habit. Dale Carnegie offers a set of practical formulas you can put to work today. In our fast-paced world--formulas that will last a lifetime! Discover how to: Eliminate fifty percent of business worries immediately Reduce financial worries Avoid fatigue--and keep looking you Add one hour a day to your waking life Find yourself and be yourself--remember there is no one else on earth like you! How to Stop Worrying and Start Living deals with fundamental emotions and ideas. It is fascinating to read and easy to apply. Let it change and improve you. There's no need to live with worry and anxiety that keep you from enjoying a full, active and happy life!

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