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The Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli…
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The Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) (edition 2006)

by Laurie R. King

Series: Kate Martinelli (5)

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1,1163012,692 (3.74)36
Kate Martinelli has seen her share of peculiar things as a San Francisco cop, but never anything quite like this: an ornate Victorian sitting room straight out of a Sherlock Holmes story--complete with violin, tobacco-filled Persian slipper, and gunshots in the wallpaper that spell out the initials of the late queen. Philip Gilbert was a true Holmes fanatic, from his antiquated d©♭cor to his vintage wardrobe. And no mere fan of fiction's great detective, but a leading expert with a collection of priceless memorabilia--a collection some would kill for. And perhaps someone did: In his collection is a century-old manuscript purportedly written by Holmes himself--a manuscript that eerily echoes details of Gilbert's own murder. Now, with the help of her partner, Al Hawkin, Kate must follow the convoluted trail of a killer--one who may have trained at the feet of the greatest mind of all times.… (more)
Member:LaurieRKing
Title:The Art of Detection (Kate Martinelli Mysteries)
Authors:Laurie R. King
Info:Bantam (2006), Edition: First Ediition/First Printing, Hardcover, 368 pages
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The Art of Detection by Laurie R. King

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» See also 36 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
To be honest, I read this book because of the connection to Sherlock Holmes. I do Love Laurie R. Kings books. But, I do prefer her Mary Russell series. Some day I may get to her Kate Martinelli series also.

Now it's been some years since I read this book, but I remember that I found it quite interesting. Especially the finding of a lost Sherlock Holmes manuscript that could be written by Sherlock Holmes himself.

You can without problem read this book without having read the other books in this series (I know because I did that) and I think this book will appeal Sherlock Holmes fans. I do plan to re-read this book to see if I find this book better nowadays. ( )
  MaraBlaise | May 19, 2019 |
It was fun to watch how King combined her fondness for Sherlock Holmes with her modern detective series. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jan 28, 2019 |
"Is this one of those porn stories that have Holmes and Watson in bed together?" No, sadly not. ( )
  Joanna.Oyzon | Apr 17, 2018 |
http://tinyurl.com/ybzkx95x

This one tickled my fancy more than others she's written. What King did here was put ALL her feelings about the LGBT community into one smartly delivered package (although it's certainly true that her previous books have provided plenty of her thoughts in that area).

And, of course, she takes this opportunity to start merging her series together - in this case her Sherlock Holmes series and her lesbian detective series - by writing a short story a la Holmes inside a contemporary detective novel. At first, I was surprised that she was going to have Martinelli read the entire story, but when I had finished that part, I understood why she followed that course of action.

The short story is integral to the completion of the novel, mostly because they mirror each other but also because they contain precisely the same themes. There are all the hallmarks of the Martinelli stories - lesbian families, supportive cops and friends, descriptions of some of the best places in the San Francisco area (hello, Marin Headlands!), life-threatening situations only Kate can handle - but it is missing one common theme, which is religion. One of the things I have always liked about King stories is that they often contain theological themes. In this novel, she has supplanted that with something equally important.

The book also feels like it's wrapping up a lot of history (aka 5 novels in the same series) and I don't expect to see another one for Kate Martinelli for a long time, if ever. I think I'm okay with that, because of how she finished this one. ( )
  khage | Jun 11, 2017 |
I spent a year stationed at Fort Baker, so much of the story takes place on familiar terrain; every now and then there was be an "I remember that" moment while I read. On the other hand, there's a factual error in the embedded "short story"--Fort Cronkhite didn't exist until 1937--that annoys me. It's hard to think most readers would care, though.

But gosh this one's fun, if a bit odd. I'm gonna miss Kate Martinelli and her friends. ( )
  joeldinda | Jul 2, 2016 |
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This book, as all others, I put at the feet of Kate Miciak, editor and friend, without whom my words would just lie on the floor, kicking feebly.
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Kate Martinelli had been in an number of weird places during her years as a cop.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Kate Martinelli has seen her share of peculiar things as a San Francisco cop, but never anything quite like this: an ornate Victorian sitting room straight out of a Sherlock Holmes story--complete with violin, tobacco-filled Persian slipper, and gunshots in the wallpaper that spell out the initials of the late queen. Philip Gilbert was a true Holmes fanatic, from his antiquated d©♭cor to his vintage wardrobe. And no mere fan of fiction's great detective, but a leading expert with a collection of priceless memorabilia--a collection some would kill for. And perhaps someone did: In his collection is a century-old manuscript purportedly written by Holmes himself--a manuscript that eerily echoes details of Gilbert's own murder. Now, with the help of her partner, Al Hawkin, Kate must follow the convoluted trail of a killer--one who may have trained at the feet of the greatest mind of all times.

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Fifth in Laurie R. King's Kate Martinelli series, Detective Martinelli must solve a modern day murder of a Sherlock Holmes collector that seems to tie into a lost detective story apparently written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself.
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