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The Overcoat and Other Short Stories by…
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The Overcoat and Other Short Stories

by Nikolai Gogol

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Quando se fala desse livro, a conhecida frase de Dostoiévski não pode ser evitada: "Todos nós viemos de O Capote". ( )
  JuliaBoechat | Mar 30, 2013 |
If subsequent Russian greats claimed to have built on Gogol, I find that they did indeed progress beyond him. The 4 stories in this collection hold the readers interest and they seem consistently tight, but Ivan Ivanovich is no Ivan Ilyich. The Overcoat, the title work for this collection was the best of the 4. Character development was perfect and the ending intriguing. Two of the oother stories were entertaining, though anti-climactic. The Nose was a complete disappointment. The quality of writing is there but the concept was completely absurd and the author's stepping out of voice at the end explained rather than saved it. What I enjoyed most about Gogol was his ability to paint a scene through partial strokes of character and scenery details. I also enjoyed how he often directly states that no more needs to be said about certain minor characters. ( )
  jpsnow | Jul 21, 2011 |
I was dubious when first assigned to read this, but I learned to enjoy Gogol's work. His stories are fun, often funny, and whimsical without being frivolous. Through Gogol I developed a better appreciation for Russian literature -- there's more to it than 'Crime and Punishment'. I rated this book at 2 stars, because some stories included were less enjoyable than others. ( )
  TheBooknerd | Mar 23, 2010 |
The Nose: barber finds nose in his morning bread; officer wakes to find his face is missing his nose; same nose seen parading the streets of Russia in full military dress. ( )
  stunik | Mar 27, 2009 |
This story is catching. Initially it is simply a sad little tale of a little man, the kind of man who is in no way noteworthy, who spends his days as a clerk and his evenings at home in a modest room. It is bleakly Russian, with descriptions of the bitter chill of a St. Petersburg winter, the hautiness of recently promoted officials, the destitution and meaningless suffering of a character who has done no wrong. And yet this story is not serious, really. I mean, in some ways it is serious, but it does not follow the typical moralistic cliches, does not make out the poverty-stricken clerk to be in Dickensian misery, or morally reprobate, or alternately a heroic individual. He's simply a little man. But when his coat is stolen, and you've seen how he scrimped and scraped just to be able to afford it, and he dies an ignoble death of the fever because of the loss of his coat, you cannot help but feel pity. He is a pitiful character.

If the story ended here it would be a simple story, not quite as maudlin as the Little Match Girl, or the Gift of the Magi. In fact, it wouldn't be particularly memorable. But the story continues, with Arkaky (our stricken "hero") rising from the dead to steal coats from passersby. And even so, it is not told in a haunting, frightening, creepy way, but rather as a fitting and just answer to the injustices of his life. This story is not exactly serious and not exactly funny, though it is both in places. It is real without being gritty and true without being moralistic. It is quite simply satisfying. That's the only word that truly fits.
3 vote myfanwy | Oct 12, 2007 |
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In the department of—but it is better not to mention the
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0486270572, Paperback)

Four works by great 19th-century Russian author: "The Nose," a savage satire of Russia's incompetent bureaucrats; "Old-Fashioned Farmers," a pleasant depiction of an elderly couple living in rustic seclusion; "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarrelled with Ivan Nikiforovich," one of Gogol’s most famous comic stories; and "The Overcoat," widely considered a masterpiece of form. Includes a selection from the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:17 -0400)

Four works by great 19th-century Russian author: "The Nose," a savage satire of Russia's incompetent bureaucrats; "Old-Fashioned Farmers," a pleasant depiction of an elderly couple living in rustic seclusion; "The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich Quarrelled with Ivan Nikiforovich," one of Gogol's most famous comic stories; and "The Overcoat," widely considered a masterpiece of form.

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