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Cyrano de Bergerac (1897)

by Edmond Rostand

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,189661,186 (4.13)131
One of the most beloved heroes of the stage, Cyrano de Bergerac is a magnificent wit who, despite his many gifts, feels that no woman can ever love him because of his enormous nose. He adores the beautiful Roxanne but, lacking courage, decides instead to help the tongue-tied but winsome Christian woo the fair lady by providing him with flowery sentiments and soulful poetry. Roxanne is smitten-but is it Christian she loves or Cyrano? A triumph from the moment of its 1897 premiere, Cyrano de Bergerac has become one of the most frequently produced plays in the world. Its perennial popularity is a tribute to the universal appeal of its themes and characters.… (more)
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» See also 131 mentions

English (50)  French (10)  Italian (3)  Portuguese (1)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (66)
Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
I liked this book better than the other books I had to read for Honors English. This is a really fun and exciting play. I would read it just for fun if i wanted to! ( )
  Emma.June.Lyon | Feb 23, 2021 |
NA
  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
Sembrerà forse retorica, ma credo esistano davvero libri che non possono esser recensiti, ma solo assaporati e personaggi che altro non possono diventare se non immortali. Il romanzo di Rostand è uno di questi libri. Cirano è uno di questi personaggi. ( )
  Carlomascellani73 | Oct 30, 2020 |
At the risk of sounding like a bit of a fool, I have to say that I was surprised at how much I enjoyed reading Edmond Rostand’s 1897 play Cyrano de Bergerac. The version of the play that I read was translated by Lowell Bair and first published by Signet Classics in 1972. My surprise came from not having particularly enjoyed either movie version of Cyrano that I’ve seen, and assuming that was the play’s fault rather than the fault of the two movies.

The unrealistic plot of Cyrano de Bergerac, as it turns out, is precisely what makes it so charming. Imagine what has to be the greatest swordsmen in French history (the play is set in 1640), a man who can write poetry aloud while in the midst of a swordfight for his very life. Such a man would be a romantic hero in any country of the period, but because Cyrano has also been blessed with one of the longest noses in French history, he is not exactly having to fight off the women.

Our hero is, in fact, madly in love with his first cousin, Roxanne. Roxanne, though, is the kind of woman who can only imagine herself ever falling in love with a handsome man – and in Cyrano’s friend Christian, she finds just what she is looking for. Unfortunately for Christian and Roxanne, Christian’s ability to creatively express his feelings is at the opposite end of the scale from his good looks. If Roxanne ever figures out just how dull-witted the man is, she is certain to ban him from her life. And that’s where Cyrano comes in.

Cyrano’s ability to write a love letter is exceeded only by his ability to kill eight or ten men in a single swordfight. Christian obviously needs help (probably in both areas), and Cyrano is willing to write his love letters as a way of himself staying close to Roxanne. The beautiful Roxanne, though, has attracted more than two suitors (even though she doesn’t even realize that Cyrano is one of them), and that complicates the plot considerably.

Cyrano de Bergerac is dramatic; it is funny; and its puns (especially those regarding Cyrano’s nose) are brilliant. The play’s final act is obviously overly-melodramatic, but actually, it’s really no less realistic than the rest of the play. The same theater-goers who laughed their way through most of the play probably never thought they would be leaving the theater in tears when the final curtain closed, but I’m willing to bet that’s exactly what happened to many of them. The fictional Cyrano de Bergerac is an unforgettable character, and even though the play’s author believed the play to be a literary disaster, it turned out to be the one that made him famous – and has kept him that way. ( )
  SamSattler | Sep 30, 2020 |
2020 reread via full cast LATW audiobook (streamed from their website):
I think this reread was my 4th or 5th time. While I enjoyed it as always, this translation by Anthony Burgess wasn't the best one I have experienced. Or maybe it was the way the play was adapted by Barry Creyton... in any case, something about it was just not up to my expectations. However, the interview with Sue Lloyd, author of The Man Who Was Cyrano: A Life of Edmond Rostand, included at the conclusion of the play brings my rating up to 4.5*. I had no idea that Cyrano & Roxanne were historical figures from the 17th century! I had assumed that Rostand had made them up.

This recording has the following cast:
Caroline Aaron as Lise/Mother Marguerite
Hugo Armstrong as Le Bret
Kalen Harriman as Foodseller/Others
Gregory Itzin as Comte De Guiche
Hamish Linklater as Cyrano
Anna Mathias as Duenna/Others
Morgan Ritchie as Valvert/Bellerose/Others
Jason Ritter as Christian
André Sogliuzzo as Ragueneau/Ligniere/Others
Devon Sorvari as Roxane
Matthew Wolf as Cuigy/Others ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 17, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (89 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rostand, EdmondAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bair, LowellTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Besnier, PatrickForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bigliosi Franck, CinziaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brissaud, PierreIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burgess, AnthonyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Connor, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cronk, NicholasIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cuomo, FrancoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dole, Helen B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Donne, RichardCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fry, ChristopherTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gips, PhilCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hall, GertrudeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hooker, BrianTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pavis, PatriceEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Untermeyer, LouisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
It was to the soul of CYRANO that I intended to dedicate this poem.
But since that soul has been reborn in you, COQUELIN, it is to you that I dedicate it.
- E. R.
First words
The hall of the Hotel de Bourgogne in 1640.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is the play by Edmond Rostand. It should not be combined with any adaptation (e.g., do not combine it with any film adaptation).
Publisher's editors
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Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
One of the most beloved heroes of the stage, Cyrano de Bergerac is a magnificent wit who, despite his many gifts, feels that no woman can ever love him because of his enormous nose. He adores the beautiful Roxanne but, lacking courage, decides instead to help the tongue-tied but winsome Christian woo the fair lady by providing him with flowery sentiments and soulful poetry. Roxanne is smitten-but is it Christian she loves or Cyrano? A triumph from the moment of its 1897 premiere, Cyrano de Bergerac has become one of the most frequently produced plays in the world. Its perennial popularity is a tribute to the universal appeal of its themes and characters.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0451528921, 014044968X

Talonbooks

An edition of this book was published by Talonbooks.

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