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Terminal World by Alastair Reynolds
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Terminal World (edition 2010)

by Alastair Reynolds

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1,0933318,657 (3.49)1 / 41
Fiction. Literature. Science Fiction. Spearpoint, the last human city, is an atmosphere-piercing spire of vast size. Clinging to its skin are the zones, a series of semi-autonomous city-states, each of which enjoys a different-and rigidly enforced-level of technology. Following an infiltration mission that went tragically wrong, Quillon has been living incognito, working as a pathologist in the district morgue. But when a near-dead angel drops onto his dissecting table, Quillon's world is wrenched apart one more time. If Quillon is to save his life, he must leave his home and journey into the cold and hostile lands beyond Spearpoint's base, starting an exile that will take him further than he could ever imagine. But there is far more at stake than just Quillon's own survival, for the limiting technologies of the zones are determined not by governments or police but by the very nature of reality-and reality itself is showing worrying signs of instability.… (more)
Member:deftnerd
Title:Terminal World
Authors:Alastair Reynolds
Info:Gollancz (2010), Kindle Edition, 496 pages
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Terminal World by Alastair Reynolds

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» See also 41 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
A rather strange mix of steampunk and sci-fi with a hint of fantasy thrown in.   All in all, a rather good mix.

This is another one of Alastair's trilogy in a single novel book, so if you aren't in for a long haul then don't bother.   But if you don't mind a thousand Kindle Loc points of reading to get through this'll keep you going.

While i didn't find it anything like the normal page turners that Alastair generally puts out, i did keep coming back to it twice a day for a little read and soon got through it.

So, while not the greatest thing that Alastair has ever written, and personally wishing he'd just stick to the sci-fi that he's so brilliant at, it's still a fairly good read.

Next book in Alastair's timeline is Troika. ( )
  5t4n5 | Aug 9, 2023 |
This book is based on very complex ideas, and packed with action. Not everything resolved by the end, usually a peeve for me, but it had enough answers to be a complete novel. I want to find the sequel (I'm sure there must be one) and start reading it right away.

ETA: no, there apparently is no sequel as of 2017. ( )
  JudyGibson | Jan 26, 2023 |
This book, like all other books by Alastair Reynolds, was interesting, well-written, and a bit uncommon - which is a good thing, I believe.

It didn't make it to a full 5 stars in my rating because there were too many unanswered questions remaining in the end. The story was still good, but perhaps I'm selfish in wanting more. But maybe he just wanted us to think for ourselves, or maybe he just didn't think it was really important. I suppose to answer all the questions may have made the book significantly bigger, and that wasn't in the cards.

By the way, I "read" the audiobook version, which was well read and easy to follow. ( )
  MartyFried | Oct 9, 2022 |
The world was nebulous (compared to revelation space), the plot dense with cliches and characters so unlikeable I was rooting for the carnivorgs (flesh eating brain slurping mechanical dogs). Honestly, the bad-ass woman who can't stop swearing gets old really quickly. The core idea of zones of different technological advancement was an interesting and a really fun conceit. ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
I'm not really a fan of space operas, so this book was a nice departure from his other writing. The only reason I didn't give it 4 stars is that it had this tendency to explain things. What it really needed was a good editor to cut that stuff out. ( )
  billycongo | Jul 22, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alastair Reynoldsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Tervaharju, HannuTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"And Earth is but a star, that once had shone." The Golden Journey to Samarkand, James Elroy Flecker
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The call came in to the Department of Hygiene and Public Works just before five in the afternoon.
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Fiction. Literature. Science Fiction. Spearpoint, the last human city, is an atmosphere-piercing spire of vast size. Clinging to its skin are the zones, a series of semi-autonomous city-states, each of which enjoys a different-and rigidly enforced-level of technology. Following an infiltration mission that went tragically wrong, Quillon has been living incognito, working as a pathologist in the district morgue. But when a near-dead angel drops onto his dissecting table, Quillon's world is wrenched apart one more time. If Quillon is to save his life, he must leave his home and journey into the cold and hostile lands beyond Spearpoint's base, starting an exile that will take him further than he could ever imagine. But there is far more at stake than just Quillon's own survival, for the limiting technologies of the zones are determined not by governments or police but by the very nature of reality-and reality itself is showing worrying signs of instability.

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