HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Master of Go (1954)

by Yasunari Kawabata

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2593715,077 (3.99)94
Go is a game of strategy in which two players attempt to surround each other's black or white stones. Simple in its fundamentals, infinitely complex in its execution, Go is an essential expression of the Japanese spirit. And in his fictional chronicle of a match played between a revered and heretofore invincible Master and a younger, more modern challenger, Yasunari Kawabata captured the moment in which the immutable traditions of imperial Japan met the onslaught of the twentieth century. The competition between the Master of Go and his opponent, Otaké, is waged over several months and layered in ceremony. But beneath the game's decorum lie tensions that consume not only the players themselves but their families and retainers--tensions that turn this particular contest into a duel that can only end in death. Luminous in its detail, both suspenseful and serene, The Master of Go is an elegy for an entire society, written with the poetic economy and psychological acumen that brought Kawabata the Nobel Prize for Literature. Translated from the Japanese by Edward G. Seidensticker… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 94 mentions

English (33)  Spanish (3)  French (1)  All languages (37)
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
Story: 6 / 10
Characters: 6
Setting: 7
Prose: 6 ( )
  MXMLLN | Jan 12, 2024 |
kudakutemo
kudakutemo
ari mizu no tsuki. Choshu

Anche se vien infranta
e di nuovo infranta e’ sempre la’
la luna sull’acqua. (225)

Puo’ un occidentale capire il gioco del go?

.. la distanza siderale che separa il go dal “gioco nobile” dell’occidente: gli scacchi. Questi sono la chiara illustrazione di un universo “pieno” (il gioco inizia con i pezzi gia’ disposti sulla scacchiera) e gerarchizzato (pezzi diversi che assolvono a funzioni diverse): esempio tipico di modello centrato in cui la partita termina con la morte definitiva di uno dei due re e dunque con il definitivo annientamento dell’avversario. Per quanto carichi di sapori e suggestioni medievali, gli scacchi - nella loro infantile rozzezza la quale fa piu’ appello all’uso del modello spinale che non a quello del sistema nervoso - costituiscono una eccellente metafora dell’evoluzione del sistema sociale occidentale… (225)

“Nel go o nello shogi, non ci si deve sforzare di comprendere la personalita’ dell’avversario. Scrutare l’animo di chi ti sta di fronte, secondo lo spirito del go, e’ la via sbagliata” disse una volta il maestro… (83)

… ritenevo ugualmente che in occidente lo spirito del go venisse negato. In Giappone e’ una “via”, un’arte che trascende la nozione stessa di forza e gioco. (117)
( )
  NewLibrary78 | Jul 22, 2023 |
Really, I want to give this 3.5. It is one of Kawabata's best works, but it probably isn't the one we readers like the best. This is even more spare and subtle than Kawabata's other work and it takes reading it at the "right time, in the headspace" to really appreciate it. And I think, as time goes on, it will be more and more difficult for readers to connect with and/or comprehend this novel (and the historical 1938 game). ( )
  AQsReviews | Nov 13, 2022 |
First published in Japan in 1951 and translated into English in 1972, Kawabata's story slightly fictionalizes a real game of Go, played in 1938 by a Master of the game and a younger challenger.

The story begins with the Master's death about a year after the match, and then plays with time a little as we go back and forth, slowly revealing the events of the match. Kawabata himself had reported the real-life match for the newspapers, much like his narrator-reporter named Uragami in the text. The tension ratchets up throughout the match, and Go itself becomes not just a game but a stand-in for the old and the new guard in Japanese society, all the more elegiac for knowing that the Master died, and that Japan had lost in World War 2. I'm sure some of the nuances of both the game (which I knew nothing about before opening this book) and society were lost on me, but it was an absorbing read all the same. ( )
  bell7 | Sep 24, 2022 |
really soothing
makes me want to play go ( )
  schumacherrr | Feb 21, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Yasunari Kawabataprimary authorall editionscalculated
Felstead, CathyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frankenhuysen, Annemarie vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seidensticker, Edward G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wolterbeek, VincentCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
[None]
Dedication
[None]
First words
Mr Kawabata has described The Master of Go as 'a faithful chronicle-novel'.

Introduction.
Shūsai, Master of Go, twenty-first in the Honimbō succession, died in Atami, at the Urokaya Inn, on the morning of January 18, 1940.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Go is a game of strategy in which two players attempt to surround each other's black or white stones. Simple in its fundamentals, infinitely complex in its execution, Go is an essential expression of the Japanese spirit. And in his fictional chronicle of a match played between a revered and heretofore invincible Master and a younger, more modern challenger, Yasunari Kawabata captured the moment in which the immutable traditions of imperial Japan met the onslaught of the twentieth century. The competition between the Master of Go and his opponent, Otaké, is waged over several months and layered in ceremony. But beneath the game's decorum lie tensions that consume not only the players themselves but their families and retainers--tensions that turn this particular contest into a duel that can only end in death. Luminous in its detail, both suspenseful and serene, The Master of Go is an elegy for an entire society, written with the poetic economy and psychological acumen that brought Kawabata the Nobel Prize for Literature. Translated from the Japanese by Edward G. Seidensticker

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.99)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 6
2.5 2
3 53
3.5 9
4 75
4.5 9
5 74

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 201,931,428 books! | Top bar: Always visible