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No Country for Old Men (2005)

by Cormac McCarthy

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,992270584 (4.03)312
Llewelyn Moss is hunting antelope near the Texas/Mexico border when he stumbles upon several dead men, a big stash of heroin, and more than two million dollars in cash. He takes off with the money--and the hunter becomes the hunted. A drug cartel hires a former Special Forces agent to track down the loot, and a ruthless killer joins the chase as well. Also looking for Moss is the aging Sheriff Bell, a World War II veteran who may be Moss' only hope for survival.… (more)
  1. 30
    A Simple Plan by Scott Smith (sturlington)
    sturlington: Both are books in which found money leads to unexpected, horrific consequences.
  2. 42
    The Road by Cormac McCarthy (dmitriyk)
    dmitriyk: Written simply, with a very similar style and attitude.
  3. 10
    Sunset and Sawdust by Joe R. Lansdale (cometahalley)
  4. 10
    The Nightrunners by Joe R. Lansdale (cometahalley)
  5. 10
    A Single Shot by Matthew F. Jones (PghDragonMan)
    PghDragonMan: We all think money will solve our problems. Sometimes money creates problems . . . especialy when it's other peoples' money.
  6. 32
    The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt (derelicious)
  7. 11
    Descent by Tim Johnston (sturlington)
    sturlington: The authors have similar styles, and both thrillers explore questions of fate and chance.
  8. 11
    Cities of the Plain by Cormac McCarthy (cometahalley)
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» See also 312 mentions

English (250)  Italian (9)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (2)  Danish (2)  Portuguese (1)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  All languages (269)
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
This was between a pick and a so-so. It was written without quotation marks and in phonetic dialect (used to could, bettern). It took some getting used to on my part. I feel it was a story about honor and maybe a little justice. ( )
  christyco125 | Jul 4, 2022 |
https://fromtheheartofeurope.eu/no-country-for-old-men-film-and-book/

This is one of the most faithful adaptations of book to screen that I have come across, and given that the book was originally written as a screenplay, it’s not very surprising. There are a few minimal changes, of which the most drastic is that a cute teenage hitch-hiker in the book (a female character with potential) disappears from the film. However the racism of the viewpoint characters is even less leavened in the book. ( )
  nwhyte | Jun 27, 2022 |
A suburb story about chance, violence and the Inability of society to curb that violence.

Containing one of the greatest villains in all literature, Anton Chigurh murders without hesitation or even motivation and evades punishment and judgment.

The reader ends up wondering alongside Sherif Bell, where God is in all the problems of the world.

“Do you think God knows what's happenin?”
“I expect he does.”
“You think he can stop it?”
“No. I don’t.”

The death and resurrection of Jesus Christ offers a different perspective. What seemed to make no sense, and felt like an absolute tragedy, was used by God for good. The same goes in all the trials of life.

“And we know that in *all* things God works for the good of those who love him.”
(Romans 8:28) ( )
  toby.neal | Apr 8, 2022 |
i really was enjoying this book, until i wasn’t anymore. i had seen the movie and been a big fan, and was enjoying the story at a steady clip, until abruptly and with absolutely no fanfare, the main protagonist is killed, and we the reader only learn this after the fact in the next chapter, like he was a bag of leftovers forgotten at the restaurant. After this character dies, the rest of the novel is mostly long monologues from a secondary main character that really don’t go anywhere. i considered abandoning the book. ( )
  thelxdesigner | Mar 31, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
All that keeps No Country for Old Men from being a deftly executed but meretricious thriller is the presence, increasingly confused and ineffectual as the novel proceeds, of the sheriff of Comanche County, one of the "old men" alluded to in the title.
 

"No Country for Old Men" is an unholy mess of a novel, which one could speculate will be a bitter disappointment to many of those eager fans. It is an unwieldy klutz that pretends to be beach reading while dressed in the garments of serious literature (not that those are necessarily mutually exclusive concepts). It is a thriller that is barely thrilling and a tepid effort to reclaim some of the focus and possibly the audience of McCarthy's most reader-friendly novel, "All the Pretty Horses." Worst of all, it reads like a story you wished Elmore Leonard had written -- or rather, in this case, rewritten.
 
Mr. McCarthy turns the elaborate cat-and-mouse game played by Moss and Chigurh and Bell into harrowing, propulsive drama, cutting from one frightening, violent set piece to another with cinematic economy and precision. In fact, ''No Country for Old Men'' would easily translate to the big screen so long as Bell's tedious, long-winded monologues were left on the cutting room floor -- a move that would also have made this a considerably more persuasive novel.
 
In the literary world the appearance of a new Cormac McCarthy novel is a cause for celebration. It has been seven years since his Cities of the Plain, and McCarthy has made the wait worthwhile. With a title that makes a statement about Texas itself, McCarthy offers up a vision of awful power and waning glory, like a tale told by a hermit emerging from the desert, a biblical Western from a cactus-pricked Ancient Mariner.
 
Cormac McCarthy's ''No Country for Old Men'' is as bracing a variation on these noir orthodoxies as any fan of the genre could expect, although his admirers may not be sure at first about quite how to take the book, which doesn't bend its genre or transcend it but determinedly straightens it back out.
added by eereed | editNew York Times, Walter Kirn (Jun 24, 2005)
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cormac McCarthyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Barrett, SeanNarratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Murillo Fort, LuisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pearson, DavidCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stechschulte, TomNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Testa, MartinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vlek, RonaldTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
The author would like to express his appreciation to the Santa Fe Institute for his long association and his four-year residence. He would also like to thank Amanda Urban.
First words
I sent one boy to the gaschamber at Huntsville.
Quotations
If you had told me we'd end up in a world with kids with green hair and bones in their noses I would have laughed in your face. But here it is.
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Llewelyn Moss is hunting antelope near the Texas/Mexico border when he stumbles upon several dead men, a big stash of heroin, and more than two million dollars in cash. He takes off with the money--and the hunter becomes the hunted. A drug cartel hires a former Special Forces agent to track down the loot, and a ruthless killer joins the chase as well. Also looking for Moss is the aging Sheriff Bell, a World War II veteran who may be Moss' only hope for survival.

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Book description
Set along the United States–Mexico border in 1980, the story concerns an illicit drug deal gone wrong in a remote desert location.
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Average: (4.03)
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1 42
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