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In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People With Dyslexia and…

by Thomas G. West

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1081201,594 (3.61)None
Now in its fifteenth printing, In the Mind's Eye has been recognized as a classic in its field. The book still stands alone as a uniquely compelling argument for the great importance of visual thinking and visual technologies as well as the high creative potential of many individuals with dyslexia or other learning difficulties. In this second edition, Thomas G. West reviews a number of recent developments that support and extend the perspectives and expectations originally set forth in the first edition. In addition to the original eleven portraits of famous individuals with learning difficulties (including Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison), he has added brief profiles of two dyslexic scientists known for their ability to generate, in quite different fields, powerful but unexpected innovations and discoveries: William J. Dreyer, a Caltech professor who used his highly visual imagination to see things in molecular biology and immunology well before others; and John R. (Jack) Horner, who flunked out of the University of Montana seven times (requiring letters of support for readmission) but is now known as one of the three most important paleontologists in the world. Recognized as among the "best of the best" by the American Library Association in their broad psychology and neuroscience category, this title belongs on the bookshelves of all educators and anyone with an interest in visual thinking, visual technologies, and highly creative people with learning difficulties.… (more)
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This book is a good example of the trend of retrodiagnosing historical figures, in this case mainly with dyslexia. There is a good deal of fascinating biographical information in this book. I was especially interested in the description of Benoit Mandelbrot. But it also uses some fairly dated definitions of neurological conditions, and I am not sure whether even the broad version of "dyslexia" the author uses, fits all the (mostly dead) people described or not. ( )
  anhaga | May 27, 2006 |
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Now in its fifteenth printing, In the Mind's Eye has been recognized as a classic in its field. The book still stands alone as a uniquely compelling argument for the great importance of visual thinking and visual technologies as well as the high creative potential of many individuals with dyslexia or other learning difficulties. In this second edition, Thomas G. West reviews a number of recent developments that support and extend the perspectives and expectations originally set forth in the first edition. In addition to the original eleven portraits of famous individuals with learning difficulties (including Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison), he has added brief profiles of two dyslexic scientists known for their ability to generate, in quite different fields, powerful but unexpected innovations and discoveries: William J. Dreyer, a Caltech professor who used his highly visual imagination to see things in molecular biology and immunology well before others; and John R. (Jack) Horner, who flunked out of the University of Montana seven times (requiring letters of support for readmission) but is now known as one of the three most important paleontologists in the world. Recognized as among the "best of the best" by the American Library Association in their broad psychology and neuroscience category, this title belongs on the bookshelves of all educators and anyone with an interest in visual thinking, visual technologies, and highly creative people with learning difficulties.

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