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The Liars' Club: A Memoir (1995)

by Mary Karr

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Mary Karr's Memoirs (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,032813,042 (3.77)124
Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. HTML:‚??Wickedly funny and always movingly illuminating, thanks to kick-ass storytelling and a poet's ear.‚?Ě ‚??Oprah.com
 
The New York Times bestselling, hilarious tale of Mary Karr‚??s hardscrabble Texas childhood that Oprah.com calls the best memoir of a generation.

The Liars‚?? Club took the world by storm and raised the art of the memoir to an entirely new level, bringing about a dramatic revival of the form. Karr‚??s comic childhood in an east Texas oil town brings us characters as darkly hilarious as any of J. D. Salinger‚??s‚??a hard-drinking daddy, a sister who can talk down the sheriff at age twelve, and an oft-married mother whose accumulated secrets threaten to destroy them all. This unsentimental and profoundly moving account of an apocalyptic childhood is as ‚??funny, lively, and un-put-downable‚?Ě (USA Today… (more)
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» See also 124 mentions

English (75)  German (2)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  All languages (80)
Showing 1-5 of 75 (next | show all)
couldn't read past the traumatic parts
  FKarr | May 26, 2024 |
I know this is sort of a pinnacle of nonfiction - but I found it to be a bit boring and hard to follow. There were a few great short stories thrown into the bigger picture - but I am still not sure what the bigger picture is and lordy did it take forever to complete this book. I'd give it a 2.5/5 stars, but as that isn't an option, I rounded up.

If you're a writer or a fan of nonfiction, this one is probably already on your radar. Otherwise, I'd recommend passing this one up completely. ( )
  BreePye | Oct 6, 2023 |
Emotionally raw and viscerally honest, Liars Club is exactly what we in the 21st century expect from a memoir: a personal recollection of events from a segment of a life, told in a way that makes a complete story. That this is what we expect, is precisely because Karr virtually invented the modern memoir with this book. Highly recommended. ( )
  rumbledethumps | Jun 26, 2023 |
It must have been painful for the author to write this book, the way I feel when I think about writing out certain episodes of my life, and they thus remain locked in my head.
This is about a family that lives in a small town in East Texas, close to the Louisiana border. If I thought my own family was dysfunctional, well this book makes my family look like The Sound of Music. Mama has mental illness, complicated by alcoholism, Dad is a macho who also drinks a lot. We don't find out till the ending why mama is screwed up, but it's truly a wonder that those two kids made it to adulthood.
Well-written, it glides right along, and is hard to put down because you just want to find what is the next outlandish thing to happen to this family that will make you wince. ( )
  burritapal | Oct 23, 2022 |
I might have liked this better if I hadn't read "The Glass Castle" - just seemed too much the same although I know they are both real stories of young girls growing up in unusual circumstances. Mary Karr's mother was not suited for motherhood or the environment of eastern Texas. The writing was fine, I just couldn't particularly get into it. Did not finish (Not sure why I had this on my "later" list to read) ( )
  maryreinert | Nov 22, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 75 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mary Karrprimary authorall editionscalculated
Dunham, LenaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
We have our secrets and our needs to confess. We may remember how, in childhood, adults were able at first to look right through us, and into us, and what an accomplishment it was when we, in fear and trembling, could tell our first lie, and make, for ourselves, the discovery that we are irredeemably alone in certain respects, and know that within the territory of ourselves, there can only be our own footprints. -R.D. Laing, The Divided Self
Dedication
For Charlie Marie Moore Karr and J.P. Karr who taught me to love books and stories, respectively
First words
My sharpest memory is of a single instant surrounded by dark.
Not long before my mother died, the tile guy redoing her kitchen pried from the wall a tile with an unlikely round hole in it. -Introduction, December 2004
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. HTML:‚??Wickedly funny and always movingly illuminating, thanks to kick-ass storytelling and a poet's ear.‚?Ě ‚??Oprah.com
 
The New York Times bestselling, hilarious tale of Mary Karr‚??s hardscrabble Texas childhood that Oprah.com calls the best memoir of a generation.

The Liars‚?? Club took the world by storm and raised the art of the memoir to an entirely new level, bringing about a dramatic revival of the form. Karr‚??s comic childhood in an east Texas oil town brings us characters as darkly hilarious as any of J. D. Salinger‚??s‚??a hard-drinking daddy, a sister who can talk down the sheriff at age twelve, and an oft-married mother whose accumulated secrets threaten to destroy them all. This unsentimental and profoundly moving account of an apocalyptic childhood is as ‚??funny, lively, and un-put-downable‚?Ě (USA Today

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